PIERS MORGAN: Thank you, Prince Philip – you were the greatest of Britons, a selfless, strong-willed and ferociously loyal man who devoted your life to public duty, your beloved Queen and your adoptive country

By Piers Morgan for MailOnline

Dedication.

Devotion.

Duty.

That’s all you need to know about Prince Philip.

For 73 years, this extraordinarily selfless man gave his life to the service of his adoptive country and to his wife, the Queen.

He was the longest-serving royal consort to any sovereign in British history.

And he was tough, uncompromising, fiercely loyal, incredibly hard-working, unapologetically belligerent, and suffered fools as benevolently as a lion suffers a weak-willed gazelle in the African bush.

The news of the Duke of Edinburgh’s death hit me hard.

He was a constant presence in my life from the day I was born in 1965, the immovable rock at the side of my Monarch, Queen Elizabeth II.

Whenever it mattered, there he was; indomitable, steely-eyed, jut-jawed.

Philip could have been whatever he wanted to be, and he chose to be his wife’s protector and defender.

Dedication. Devotion. Duty. That's all you need to know about Prince Philip. For 73 years, this extraordinarily selfless man gave his life to the service of his adoptive country and to his wife, the Queen

Dedication. Devotion. Duty. That’s all you need to know about Prince Philip. For 73 years, this extraordinarily selfless man gave his life to the service of his adoptive country and to his wife, the Queen

Prince Philip, this gloriously alpha male warrior, played second fiddle to the woman he loved. But he did it willingly, with fierce pride. I loved him for that, and Britain loved him for that. Pictured: Queen Elizabeth holding Princess Anne, Prince Charles and Prince Philip

Prince Philip, this gloriously alpha male warrior, played second fiddle to the woman he loved. But he did it willingly, with fierce pride. I loved him for that, and Britain loved him for that. Pictured: Queen Elizabeth holding Princess Anne, Prince Charles and Prince Philip

Good-looking and blond-haired, the Prince of Greece impressed the young Princess by jumping over the college tennis nets at their first publicised meeting. Pictured: Princess Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh in a wedding photograph in 1947The couple were married for 73 years (pictured in a portrait taken to mark the 60th anniversary of The Queen's Accession in 2012)

Prince Philip gave up his glittering military career for his bride when her father King George VI suddenly died, and she succeeded to the throne at the absurdly young age of 27. Good-looking and blond-haired, the Prince of Greece impressed the young Princess by jumping over the college tennis nets at their first publicised meeting. Pictured: Princess Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh in a wedding photograph in 1947. The couple were married for 73 years (pictured in a portrait taken to mark the 60th anniversary of The Queen’s Accession in 2012)

He came through a horrendous childhood to become a British war hero on the fast-track to the very top of the Royal Navy. But he gave up his glittering military career for his bride when her father King George VI suddenly died, and she succeeded to the throne at the absurdly young age of 27. From that moment on, Philip, this gloriously alpha male warrior, played second fiddle to the woman he loved. But he did it willingly, with fierce pride. I loved him for that, and Britain loved him for that. That’s why his death has hit me so hard today. But there are many people with a more direct connection to him that it has hit a lot harder. My brother-in-law Patrick, husband of my sister Charlotte, was commissioned as an officer in the Duke of Edinburgh’s Royal Regiment whose Commander-in-Chief was Prince Philip.

And he then commanded The Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Regiment, a position that he only gained after being personally interviewed by Prince Philip, who again was Commander-in-Chief. I asked him how he felt about the news, after Charlotte told me Patrick had been in tears. ‘All ranks will be very sad to hear of his death,’ he said. ‘He had the common touch and soldiers loved talking to him because he understood them; officers likewise, but they would be challenged by him more often! As an ex-war-time officer he had the immediate respect of all veterans and serving soldiers, very straight forward and didn’t hide, not afraid to ask tough awkward questions, great sense of humour on all visits. He loved the military. It’s very sad. I really feel for the Queen who has lost someone who is irreplaceable.’

Yes, she has.

The Royal Family’s statement said: ‘It is with deep sorrow that Her Majesty The Queen announces the death of her beloved husband, His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. His Royal Highness passed away peacefully this morning at Windsor Castle. Further announcements will made in due course. The Royal Family join with people around the world in mourning his loss’. But those typically measured words hide the Queen’s real emotions. She will be utterly distraught today, at the loss of this great man who so valiantly fought her corner for more than seven decades.

The Queen will be utterly distraught today, at the loss of this great man who so valiantly fought her corner for more than seven decades. Pictured: The Queen and Philip enjoying a walk during their honeymoon at Broadlands in Hampshire in November 1947

The Queen will be utterly distraught today, at the loss of this great man who so valiantly fought her corner for more than seven decades. Pictured: The Queen and Philip enjoying a walk during their honeymoon at Broadlands in Hampshire in November 1947

He was the very best of British; a swashbuckling, risk-taking daredevil with boundless energy, deep personal courage and a sharp quick wit who understood that the primary function of the Royal Family is duty to the country. Philip is pictured on the Captain's Boat en route for HMS Chequers while in Malta in October 1949

He was the very best of British; a swashbuckling, risk-taking daredevil with boundless energy, deep personal courage and a sharp quick wit who understood that the primary function of the Royal Family is duty to the country. Philip is pictured on the Captain’s Boat en route for HMS Chequers while in Malta in October 1949

Philip knew better than anyone that the future of the Monarchy depended entirely on the public's trust in the Royal Family. Pictured: Prince Edward, Prince Charles, Princess Anne, Prince Philip, the Queen, and Prince Andrew

Philip knew better than anyone that the future of the Monarchy depended entirely on the public’s trust in the Royal Family. Pictured: Prince Edward, Prince Charles, Princess Anne, Prince Philip, the Queen, and Prince Andrew

The Royal Family's statement said: 'It is with deep sorrow that Her Majesty The Queen announces the death of her beloved husband, His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. His Royal Highness passed away peacefully this morning at Windsor Castle. Further announcements will made in due course. The Royal Family join with people around the world in mourning his loss'

The Royal Family’s statement said: ‘It is with deep sorrow that Her Majesty The Queen announces the death of her beloved husband, His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. His Royal Highness passed away peacefully this morning at Windsor Castle. Further announcements will made in due course. The Royal Family join with people around the world in mourning his loss’

And most Britons will share her sadness too. Prince Philip wasn’t a perfect human being and would have been the last person to claim that he was. No, he was flawed, intemperate, impatient and occasionally downright offensive. But that’s why we loved and respected him so much. He was his own man. He was also the very best of British; a swashbuckling, risk-taking daredevil with boundless energy, deep personal courage and a sharp quick wit who understood that the primary function of the Royal Family is duty to the country. Philip knew better than anyone that the future of the Monarchy depended entirely on the public’s trust in the Royal Family.

Prince Philip was always there; on the balconies, at the big events, in times of joy and crisis, standing by his Queen. The Queen waves from the balcony of Buckingham Palace, with the Duke by her side, after her Coronation in June 1953, with their children Prince Charles and Princess Anne

Prince Philip was always there; on the balconies, at the big events, in times of joy and crisis, standing by his Queen. The Queen waves from the balcony of Buckingham Palace, with the Duke by her side, after her Coronation in June 1953, with their children Prince Charles and Princess Anne

Princess Anne, Prince Andrew, Prince Philip, the Queen, Prince Edward and Prince Charles at Buckingham Palace in 1972

Princess Anne, Prince Andrew, Prince Philip, the Queen, Prince Edward and Prince Charles at Buckingham Palace in 1972

And that trust had to be hard-fought and hard-earned. He rarely spoke in public or had any direct dealings with the media that he made no secret of disliking. But he was always there; on the balconies, at the big events, in times of joy and crisis, standing by his Queen. It was that constant presence that was so enduringly impressive, and so comforting. Philip didn’t join the Royal circus for personal gratification, or celebrity status, or money. He joined it because he loved Elizabeth, or ‘Lilibet’ as he called her. And that ferocious abiding love overrode everything else in his life, right to the end of his life. Tonight, the Queen mourns the loss of this great man, and the whole of Britain mourns with her.

Tonight, the Queen mourns the loss of this great man, and the whole of Britain mourns with her. Pictured: Buckingham Palace announced the death of Prince Philip at just after midday today – and described the Queen’s ‘deep sorrow’

Philip has served Britain since his youth and the world is mourning his death at Windsor Castle today, with the Royal Family releasing this photo and tribute shortly after his death

Philip has served Britain since his youth and the world is mourning his death at Windsor Castle today, with the Royal Family releasing this photo and tribute shortly after his death

They were one hell of a team, and together, they conquered the affections of the world. At the centre of their relationship was a mutual sense of duty. Five years after their marriage, Philip knelt before his wife at her coronation and pledged: ‘Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, do become your liege man of life and limb and of earthly worship. And faith and truth I will bear unto you, to live and die against all manner of folks. So help me God.’ He then rose to his feet, touched her crown and kissed her on the cheek. Philip never wavered from that pledge. Every time his wife, the Queen, needed him, he was there. He would have given his life for her, just as he risked his life on the battlefield to fight for his country. Now, just two months before he would have turned 100 and been entitled to a birthday telegram of congratulations from his wife and Monarch, he’s gone.

The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh pose for a family photo after William and Kate's wedding on April 29, 2011

The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh pose for a family photo after William and Kate’s wedding on April 29, 2011

My heart breaks for Her Majesty, a woman who has served as Queen for 68 years and barely put a regal foot wrong in those seven decades. She has lost the love of her life, and the man who helped her become the great Monarch that she is. Britain has lost one of its greatest servants.

RIP Prince Philip.

Dedication.

Devotion.

Duty.

You were a truly great Briton who gave your life to selfless public duty and were an absolute rock of devoted support to The Queen.

This is a very sad day for our country.

Thank you, Sir.

The unseen Duke: Rare footage of Prince Philip’s life and career are seen for first time in stunning Pathé clips in obituary by Daily Mail’s ROBERT HARDMAN

  • The Duke of Edinburgh, 99, passed away this morning after an extraordinary life dedicated to public service 
  • Now, a poignant video tribute by the Daily Mail’s Robert Hardman has revealed rare unseen footage of Philip 
  • Some of the clips show the Duke in his younger days, as well as tributes from the Queen and Prince William 
  • The touching video obituary can also be seen here

By Robert Hardman for the Daily Mail and Danyal Hussain For Mailonline

Prince Philip’s death this morning marked the end of an extraordinary life that saw him dedicate more than 70 years to public service.  The Duke of Edinburgh, who would have turned 100 in June, was a decorated war hero in his younger days before winning the heart of a young Queen Elizabeth and becoming the longest-serving royal consort in British history. Now, a poignant video tribute by the Daily Mail’s Robert Hardman has revealed unseen footage of Prince Philip’s distinguished royal career.

The Duke retired from public duties in 2017 after seven decades of dedicated service and more than 22,000 engagements. 

His work as royal consort saw him travel all over the UK and the world, both with the Queen and alone, and charm the public, Hollywood stars and foreign dignitaries. 

As a former captain in the Royal Navy, his devotion to the armed forces was well-known. The newly-released footage shows Prince Philip looking on with pride at his final engagement as Royal Marines parade outside Buckingham Palace in 2017. 

Other clips show him in his younger days, including his wedding to the Queen in 1947 with shots of crowds celebrating the big day while their vows play on a backing track.

The obituary also looks at his upbringing in Greece – from which he escaped war-torn in a cot crafted from a fruit box after his family escaped after his father was charged with high treason. 

There is also footage of him serving in the Navy, as well as clips from his many engagements alongside the Queen.

We see him enjoying his time with his children, as well as with Prince William, who delivers a poignant statement about his love for his grandfather.  

The touching obituary concludes with Prince Philip laughing off questions about his legacy – instead saying: ‘I’d rather other people decide my legacy.’ 

The touching video obituary can also be seen here: https://www.mailplus.co.uk/ 

The Queen and Prince Philip's wedding, attended by an array of foreign kings and queens, captured the public imagination in the austere post-war days of November 1947

The Queen and Prince Philip’s wedding, attended by an array of foreign kings and queens, captured the public imagination in the austere post-war days of November 1947

A young Prince Philip is pictured here being greeted by war time Prime Minister Winston Churchill in 1955. The Duke retired from public duties in 2017 after seven decades of dedicated service and more than 22,000 engagements

A young Prince Philip is pictured here being greeted by war time Prime Minister Winston Churchill in 1955. The Duke retired from public duties in 2017 after seven decades of dedicated service and more than 22,000 engagements

The Greek prince's early life was marked by upheaval. As an infant (pictured), Philip was smuggled out of Greece in a fruit crate, while his father eluded execution before finding refuge for his family in Paris

The Greek prince’s early life was marked by upheaval. As an infant (pictured), Philip was smuggled out of Greece in a fruit crate, while his father eluded execution before finding refuge for his family in Paris

He was born on the Greek Island of Corfu on June 10, 1921, to Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark and Princess Alice of Battenberg

He was born on the Greek Island of Corfu on June 10, 1921, to Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark and Princess Alice of Battenberg

His family fled Corfu in December 1922 after his father, in the Greek army, was arrested and charged with high treason

His family fled Corfu in December 1922 after his father, in the Greek army, was arrested and charged with high treason

Prince Philip's childhood would get no easier, moving around until finally finding a place at Gordonstoun School - where he learnt many of the principles he would carry with him throughout his life

Prince Philip’s childhood would get no easier, moving around until finally finding a place at Gordonstoun School – where he learnt many of the principles he would carry with him throughout his life

Together for more than 73 years, the Duke of Edinburgh has supported the monarch through the ups and down of her life and reign - giving up a promising career in the Navy to support the woman he loved dearly

Together for more than 73 years, the Duke of Edinburgh has supported the monarch through the ups and down of her life and reign – giving up a promising career in the Navy to support the woman he loved dearly

The handsome young Duke excelled in his military career and was mentioned in despatches for his service during the Second World War. He was a midshipman aboard HMS Valiant off the southern coast of Greece when he earned his honourable citation

The handsome young Duke excelled in his military career and was mentioned in despatches for his service during the Second World War. He was a midshipman aboard HMS Valiant off the southern coast of Greece when he earned his honourable citation

His work as royal consort saw him travel all over the UK and the world, both with the Queen and alone, and charm the public, Hollywood stars and foreign dignitaries

His work as royal consort saw him travel all over the UK and the world, both with the Queen and alone, and charm the public, Hollywood stars and foreign dignitaries

Following the end of the Second World War, Philip ended his active naval career in July 1951 and then started to focus on his work in supporting the Queen following her accession to the throne in 1952. Philip was keen on sports - with a particular love for cricket and polo. His enthusiasm for outdoor activity led him to create the Duke of Edinburgh awards

Following the end of the Second World War, Philip ended his active naval career in July 1951 and then started to focus on his work in supporting the Queen following her accession to the throne in 1952. Philip was keen on sports – with a particular love for cricket and polo. His enthusiasm for outdoor activity led him to create the Duke of Edinburgh awards

Prince Philip was devoted to his wife of more than 70 years. He affectionately called her 'Lillibet' - a contraction of the name Elizabeth

Prince Philip was devoted to his wife of more than 70 years. He affectionately called her ‘Lillibet’ – a contraction of the name Elizabeth

Prince Philip famously knelt before his wife as she was crowned Queen during her coronation ceremony in June 1953

Prince Philip famously knelt before his wife as she was crowned Queen during her coronation ceremony in June 1953

Philip played a prominent part in various aspects of British life through his role as consort or companion to the Sovereign, accompanying the Queen on most of her Commonwealth tours and State Visits overseas as well as trips around the UK. Here he is pictured on the royal balcony with the Queen in 1953

Philip played a prominent part in various aspects of British life through his role as consort or companion to the Sovereign, accompanying the Queen on most of her Commonwealth tours and State Visits overseas as well as trips around the UK. Here he is pictured on the royal balcony with the Queen in 1953

Prince Philip and the Queen travelled the globe together, endured state visit after state visit, and thousands of engagements over the years

Prince Philip and the Queen travelled the globe together, endured state visit after state visit, and thousands of engagements over the years

The Queen and Prince Philip married in the 1940s and saw together the rapid advances in modern life from man walking on the moon for the first time to the invention of the internet. The pair are seen here on a boat as they wear matching shirts

The Queen and Prince Philip married in the 1940s and saw together the rapid advances in modern life from man walking on the moon for the first time to the invention of the internet. The pair are seen here on a boat as they wear matching shirts

Prince Philip relinquished his roles in the military and put country first to join Her Majesty and remain steadfastly by her side through thick and thin, for some 73 years. Here he is pictured during the pair's 1961 visit to India

Prince Philip relinquished his roles in the military and put country first to join Her Majesty and remain steadfastly by her side through thick and thin, for some 73 years. Here he is pictured during the pair’s 1961 visit to India

Together the pair toured the Commonwealth, attracting huge and adoring crowds wherever the went. Prince Philip was always dutiful in his support

Together the pair toured the Commonwealth, attracting huge and adoring crowds wherever the went. Prince Philip was always dutiful in his support

The Duke also spent much of his life involved in charities and organisations working within environmental conservation, sport, the military and engineering – with a particular interest in scientific and technological research. He had wanted to train as a fighter pilot - and later trained as a pilot (pictured) - before following in his family footsteps in joining the Navy - where he excelled

The Duke also spent much of his life involved in charities and organisations working within environmental conservation, sport, the military and engineering – with a particular interest in scientific and technological research. He had wanted to train as a fighter pilot – and later trained as a pilot (pictured) – before following in his family footsteps in joining the Navy – where he excelled 

Alongside mention of his impeccable national service, tributes to the Duke also mentioned his role as a father and grandfather. Here he is walking daughter Princess Anne down the aisle in 1973

Alongside mention of his impeccable national service, tributes to the Duke also mentioned his role as a father and grandfather. Here he is walking daughter Princess Anne down the aisle in 1973

Many courtiers feel that since Philip, who used to rule his family with an iron fist, retired from public life, 'discipline' within the royal family has not been what it should be. Here he is wearing the traditional ostrich feather hat for the annual Order of the Thistle service in Scotland

Many courtiers feel that since Philip, who used to rule his family with an iron fist, retired from public life, ‘discipline’ within the royal family has not been what it should be. Here he is wearing the traditional ostrich feather hat for the annual Order of the Thistle service in Scotland

Philip spent 65 years supporting the queen, retiring from his public role in 2017 and staying largely out of the view since.

Philip spent 65 years supporting the queen, retiring from his public role in 2017 and staying largely out of the view since.

The touching obituary concludes with Prince Philip laughing off questions about his legacy - instead saying: 'I'd rather other people decide my legacy'

The touching obituary concludes with Prince Philip laughing off questions about his legacy – instead saying: ‘I’d rather other people decide my legacy’

NATION’S RESPECTS

Prince Philip – Mourners descend on Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle to pay respects but are dispersed by police

  • 9 Apr 2021, 14:40

https://imasdk.googleapis.com/js/core/bridge3.450.0_en.html#goog_2094347332

MOURNERS have descended on Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle to pay their respects to Prince Philip but are being dispersed by police.

The Duke of Edinburgh, who had been married to the Queen for 73 years, passed away “peacefully” at Windsor Castle this morning, aged 99.

🔵 Read our live blog for the very latest news on Prince Philip’s death

The Duke of Edinburgh passed away 'peacefully' this morning
The Duke of Edinburgh passed away ‘peacefully’ this morning Credit: PA
Flowers left at the gates of Windsor Castle at the top of the long walk
Flowers left at the gates of Windsor Castle at the top of the long walk Credit: w8media
The tragic news is a huge blow to the Queen, with the Duke widely known to be the backbone of the Royal Family
The tragic news is a huge blow to the Queen, with the Duke widely known to be the backbone of the Royal Family Credit: w8media
The Prince will be laid to rest in Windsor Castle
The Prince will be laid to rest in Windsor Castle Credit: Getty
Mourners paying their respects this evening
Mourners paying their respects this evening Credit: Reuters
Palace staff placed a notice announcing the Duke's death
Palace staff placed a notice announcing the Duke’s death Credit: Rex
Mourners at dusk in London
Mourners at dusk in London Credit: Getty
Candles and flowers have been laid to mark the passing of Prince Philip
Candles and flowers have been laid to mark the passing of Prince Philip Credit: Reuters
Crowds continue to gather at dusk
Crowds continue to gather at duskCredit: Getty

Her Majesty, 94, today shared a poignant photo of Philip in a heartfelt tribute to her “strength and guide”.

The tragic news is a huge blow to the Queen, with the Duke widely known to be the backbone of the Royal Family.

Just after midday, the Union Flag was lowered to half-mast outside Buckingham Palace and on public buildings across the UK as the world mourns his death.

The Duke’s death was confirmed with the age-old tradition of placing a notice on the railings of Buckingham Palace.

A brief bulletin, on paper set in a foolscap imperial-sized dark wooden frame, is used to notify the public of key royal events such as births and deaths.

But because of the coronavirus pandemic, the notice has already been taken down to prevent crowds forming.

It comes as..

As more mourners gathered to pay their respects and laying flowers, the government urged people to stay away from Royal Residences and follow pubic health advice to “continue to avoid meeting large groups and minimising travel”.

A Cabinet Office spokesman said: “We are supporting the Royal Household in asking that floral tributes should not be laid at Royal Residences at this time.”

Her Majesty will now begin eight days of mourning before he is buried in Frogmore Gardens at Windsor Castle.

Due to the pandemic he will not be given a state funeral and his body will body will lie at rest at Windsor Castle ahead of the service funeral in St George’s Chapel.

A vast sea of flowers was left by mourners following the death of Diana, Princess of Wales in 1997, both outside Buckingham Palace and her former home Kensington Palace.

With England gradually easing itself out of a national lockdown amid the Covid crisis, both the Government and royal family are keen to avoid anything that attracts crowds.

The Queen has asked has asked for charity donations to causes close to Philip’s heart instead of flowers after his death.

The new memorial pages dedicated to the duke on the royal.uk website suggested donations could be made to organisations of which the Duke was patron.

But hundreds of people have already travelled to Windsor Castle to paid their respects.

Royal wardens dressed in red and grey suits stood outside the castle, rearranging the dozens of bunches of flowers outside the historic buildings as co-ordinators urged the public “remain socially distanced at all times.”

People gather outside Windsor Castle to pay respects
People gather outside Windsor Castle to pay respects Credit: Reuters
A tribute to Prince Philip is projected onto a large screen at Piccadilly Circus in London
A tribute to Prince Philip is projected onto a large screen at Piccadilly Circus in London Credit: AP
Police standing in front of the floral tributes as Windsor
Police standing in front of the floral tributes as Windsor Credit: Reuters
The Queen announced the death this morning
The Queen announced the death this morning
Some of the many flowers on the gates
Some of the many flowers on the gates Credit: AFP
Police officers by the gates of the palace
Police officers by the gates of the palace Credit: Getty
Flowers laid at the gates of Buckingham Palace
Flowers laid at the gates of Buckingham Palace Credit: LNP
A woman wipes away a tear from her eye
A woman wipes away a tear from her eye Credit: Reuters
Flowers laid at Windsor Castle
Flowers laid at Windsor Castle Credit: AFP
A mourner at the castle gates
A mourner at the castle gatesCredit: w8media
A woman arriving with flowers at Buckingham Palace
A woman arriving with flowers at Buckingham PalaceCredit: AP
Flowers were also laid at  flowers at Sandringham House's Ornate Gates
Flowers were also laid at  flowers at Sandringham House’s Ornate GatesCredit: Geoff Robinson
A man laying flowers at Sandringham
A man laying flowers at SandringhamCredit: � Terry Harris
A picture of the Prince at the The Two Brewers pub next to Windsor Castle
A picture of the Prince at the The Two Brewers pub next to Windsor CastleCredit: Getty
A tribute from a family among the flowers
A tribute from a family among the flowersCredit: AFP

Standing across the road from Windsor Castle was charity worker James Elliott.

“I came today because I live locally, but also because I’ve met Prince Philip before,” said the 23-year-old.

“I was part of the 12th Windsor Scout group and he came to visit our hall. It was the personal touch which was quite nice. I was about 15 but this news has hit me quite hard.

“It’s a sad day for the whole nation but for me because I grew up doing his Duke of Edinburgh programme. My parents are at work but they will come down this evening to see the flowers and pay their respects.”

Prime Minister Boris Johnson paid tribute to the “extraordinary” Prince Philip, and said the whole country would mourn the passing of a “much-loved and highly respected public figure”.

Tributes have poured in from around the world for the hardest-working member of the Royal Family after serving his country for more than seven decades.

The Prince arrived home at Windsor on March 16 in “good spirits” after a long stint in hospital.

He had been admitted weeks earlier to undergo treatment for an infection before later having heart surgery.

The Duke was said to be in “good spirits” and looking forward to returning home to his family ahead of his 100th birthday celebrations in two months time.

The pandemic will have a major impact on the carefully laid funeral arrangements, made in consultation with the duke.

Gary Smith of the Royal Marines at Windsor Castle
Gary Smith of the Royal Marines at Windsor CastleCredit: AFP
The Queen arriving at Windsor Castle
The Queen arriving at Windsor Castle
Prince Charles also entering at Windsor castle
Prince Charles also entering at Windsor castleCredit: The Sun
A tribute to the Prince at Piccadilly Circus in London
A tribute to the Prince at Piccadilly Circus in LondonCredit: AFP
A horse in tribute to the Prince's love of riding among the flowers at Windsor Castle
A horse in tribute to the Prince’s love of riding among the flowers at Windsor CastleCredit: AP
The government has urged people to stay away and not lay flowers
The government has urged people to stay away and not lay flowersCredit: Reuters
A young girl laying out a Union Jack
A young girl laying out a Union JackCredit: Avalon.red
Police outside the Palace as people were told to stay away
Police outside the Palace as people were told to stay awayCredit: Rex

With lockdown restrictions still in place, the public elements of the final farewell will not be able to take place in their original form.

As the consort of the Queen, Prince Philip is entitled to a state funeral.

But in keeping with the duke’s no-fuss public image, it is believed that he had asked not to be given a full state funeral.

Instead, it is thought that he requested what would fundamentally be a military funeral, with a private service held at St George’s Chapel in Windsor and burial in Frogmore Gardens.

Prince Charles received the devastating news of his father’s death on his 16th wedding anniversary to Camilla.

The Duke and Duchess of Cornwall were due to celebrate today but will instead be mourning the loss of Prince Philip.

Prince Harry is to fly back to Britain to attend his grandfather’s funeral as he wants “nothing more” than to be with the Queen, claim royal sources.

However, while Harry is eager to return to the UK to be with his family, it is currently unclear if wife Meghan will join him even though she reportedly wants to be by his side.

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FAMILY BOND

Harry plans to UK return for Philip’s funeral after talks with Prince Charles

HEARTBROKEN

Charles praises Philip’s achievements as Anne says ‘life will be different’

A NATION’S GRIEF

We’re all weeping with you Ma’am — Britain mourns death of Philip at 99

IN THE NAME OF THE FATHER

Charles becomes Duke of Edinburgh after dad Prince Philip dies

The Duke spent his final days with his wife at Windsor Castle, after a 28-night stay in hospital. But despite her personal pain, Her Majesty, 94, showed her dedication to the country and her family. She joined Prince Charles for a socially-distanced walk over the Easter weekend.

A teary mourner outside Buckingham Palace this evening
A teary mourner outside Buckingham Palace this eveningCredit: w8media
A mourner dabs away a tear
A mourner dabs away a tear Credit: LNP
A floral tribute to Prince Philip
A floral tribute to Prince PhilipCredit: Reuters
Police on horseback stopped crowds from gathering
Police on horseback stopped crowds from gatheringCredit: Reuters
Officers were also patrolling by Windsor Castle
Officers were also patrolling by Windsor CastleCredit: AFP
Memorials to the Duke have been projected across the UK
Memorials to the Duke have been projected across the UKCredit: AFP

https://imasdk.googleapis.com/js/core/bridge3.450.0_en.html#goog_2094347334Buckingham Palace posts Prince Philip death announcement as flags fly at half mast and Royal website ‘unavailable’

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