Treasure hunters’ plan to dig up 48 crates of Hitler’s gold worth half a billion pounds hidden under Nazis’ palace ‘brothel’ after loot’s location is revealed in SS officer’s secret diary

  • Dig expected to uncover 10 tonnes of gold in grounds of 18th century palace in Minkowskie, southern Poland
  • Treasure was stolen on orders of SS boss Heinrich Himmler towards the end of WWII to set up a Fourth Reich 
  • It is thought to include so-called ‘Gold of Breslau’ which went missing from Police headquarters in Wrocław
  • Location revealed by documents, diary and map that treasure hunters received from SS officers’ descendants

By Ed Wight and Stuart Dowell In Warsaw, Poland For Mailonline

Treasure hunters are planning to dig up what they say could be 48 crates of Nazi gold worth nearly half a billion pounds at a palace used by Hitler’s SS as a brothel. The dig, which starts next week, is hoped to uncover 10 tonnes of gold along with other valuables in the grounds of the 18th century palace in the village of Minkowskie in southern Poland. The treasure was stolen on the orders of SS boss Heinrich Himmler towards the end of WWII to set up a Fourth Reich. It is thought to include the so-called ‘Gold of Breslau’ which went missing from police headquarters in what is now the nearby Polish city of Wrocław.

It is also thought to include jewellery and valuables from the private collections of wealthy Germans who lived in the region and who handed their possessions to the SS in order to protect them from being looted by the advancing Red Army. The location was revealed by secret documents, an SS officer’s diary and a map that the treasure hunters received from the descendants of officers belonging to a secretive lodge dating back over 1,000 years.

Treasure hunters are planning to dig up what they say could be 48 crates of Nazi gold worth nearly half a billion pounds at a palace (pictured) used by Hitler's SS as a brothel

Treasure hunters are planning to dig up what they say could be 48 crates of Nazi gold worth nearly half a billion pounds at a palace (pictured) used by Hitler’s SS as a brothel

Starting next week, the dig is expected to uncover 10 tonnes of gold along with other valuables in the grounds of the 18th century palace (archive picture) in the village of Minkowskie in southern Poland

Starting next week, the dig is expected to uncover 10 tonnes of gold along with other valuables in the grounds of the 18th century palace (archive picture) in the village of Minkowskie in southern Poland

The location was revealed by secret documents, a diary (pictured) and a map that the treasure hunters received from the descendants of SS officers belonging to a secretive lodge worshipped by Himmler and dating back over 1,000 years

The location was revealed by secret documents, a diary (pictured) and a map that the treasure hunters received from the descendants of SS officers belonging to a secretive lodge worshipped by Himmler and dating back over 1,000 years

Among the bundle of documents is a letter (pictured) from a senior SS officer called von Stein to one of the girls who worked at the palace in Minkowskie and who later became his lover. The officer wrote: 'My dear Inge, I will fufill my assignment, with God's will. Some transports were successful. The remaining 48 heavy Reichsbank's chests and all the family chests I hereby entrust to you. 'Only you know where they are located. May God help you and help me, fulfil my assignment'A diary (one page pictured), said to have been written by a high-ranking SS officer under the pseudonym Michaelis, last year revealed the location of another palace in the region where it is thought 28 tonnes of treasure is buried at the bottom of a well
Among the bundle of documents is a letter (left) from a senior SS officer called von Stein to one of the girls who worked at the palace in Minkowskie and who later became his lover. The officer wrote: ‘My dear Inge, I will fufill my assignment, with God’s will. Some transports were successful. The remaining 48 heavy Reichsbank’s chests and all the family chests I hereby entrust to you. Only you know where they are located. May God help you and help me, fulfil my assignment.’ Right: A diary (one page pictured), said to have been written by a high-ranking SS officer under the pseudonym Michaelis, last year revealed the location of another palace in the region where it is thought 28 tonnes of treasure is buried at the bottom of a well

The same diary, said to have been written by a high-ranking SS officer under the pseudonym Michaelis, last year revealed the location of another palace in the region where it is thought 28 tonnes of treasure is buried at the bottom of a well.

The treasure was stolen on the orders of SS boss Heinrich Himmler (pictured) towards the end of WWII to set up a Fourth Reich

The treasure was stolen on the orders of SS boss Heinrich Himmler (pictured) towards the end of WWII to set up a Fourth Reich 

But the treasure hunters say they will start digging at the new location because the buried loot is easier to access. Among the bundle of documents is a letter from a senior SS officer called von Stein to one of the girls who worked at the palace in Minkowskie and who later became his lover. The officer wrote: ‘My dear Inge, I will fulfill my assignment, with God’s will. Some transports were successful. The remaining 48 heavy Reichsbank’s chests and all the family chests I hereby entrust to you. ‘Only you know where they are located. May God help you and help me, fulfil my assignment.’

The pencil-written pages of the diary are said to identify 11 locations across Lower Silesia which before and during the war was German territory. An entry from March 12, 1945, referring to the treasure at the palace in Minkowskie says: ‘A trough has been dug in the orangery, which is a safe “home” for the delivered chests and containers.’ It continues: ’48 chests from the Reichsbank, in good condition, were hidden, very well covered with earth and “greened” with still living plants. ‘Let providence watch over us.’

The pencil-written pages of the diary (pictured) are said to identify 11 locations across Lower Silesia which before and during the war was German territory.Roman Furmaniak, head of the Silesian Bridge foundation leading the hunt for the treasure, holding the diary
The pencil-written pages of the diary (left) are said to identify 11 locations across Lower Silesia which before and during the war was German territory. Right: Roman Furmaniak, head of the Silesian Bridge foundation leading the hunt for the treasure, holding the diary 

Roman Furmaniak, head of the Silesian Bridge foundation leading the hunt for the treasure, told MailOnline: ‘Several people took part in hiding the deposits in Minkowskie. One of them was an officer called von Stein. ‘He used to stay in the palace because he had a lover there. Due to its location it was often visited by high-ranking SS officers who treated it like a brothel.’

Hitler's SS used the building as a brothel. Pictured: Hitler in 1945

Hitler’s SS used the building as a brothel. Pictured: Hitler in 1945

Inge was the guardian appointed by von Stein to keep an eye on the hiding place. Furmaniak said: ‘She was in love with the handsome officer in a black SS uniform. They were like gods. ‘She believed that she would have to stay there for a year, maybe two, then it would all be over. ‘Nobody believed then that the region would come under the control of the Soviet Union. ‘There was a two-month period in 1945 when she had to hide in the forest from the Russians. But when she got back, the area had not been disturbed. ‘If they had dug a hole, they would have taken what they wanted and then left the hole. We have seen this in history many times in Poland.’ At the end of the war, the region was handed over to the new Soviet-controlled Poland, the entire German population was expelled and Poles who had been living in Western Ukraine arrived.

To blend in with the new population, Inge changed her appearance and identity – eventually marrying a local man – and continued to watch over the treasure until her death 60 years later. The palace in Minkowskie dates back to the 18th century when it was built by Prussian general Friedrich Wilhelm von Seydlitz. Over the years it changed hands several times and after the war the Red Army and the Polish Army were stationed there at different times. Later it was used as a local council office, a kindergarten and even a cinema. Now, in a dilapidated state and in private hands, the Silesian Bridge foundation has taken a long-term lease on the property.A diary entry from March 12, 1945, referring to the treasure at the palace (pictured) in Minkowskie says: 'A trough has been dug in the orangery, which is a safe "home" for the delivered chests and containers'

A diary entry from March 12, 1945, referring to the treasure at the palace (pictured) in Minkowskie says: ‘A trough has been dug in the orangery, which is a safe “home” for the delivered chests and containers’

Roman Furmaniak, head of the Silesian Bridge foundation leading the hunt for the treasure, told MailOnline: 'Several people took part in hiding the deposits in Minkowskie. One of them was an officer called von Stein. He used to stay in the palace (an interior image, pictured) because he had a lover there. Due to its location it was often visited by high-ranking SS officers who treated it like a brothel'

Roman Furmaniak, head of the Silesian Bridge foundation leading the hunt for the treasure, told MailOnline: ‘Several people took part in hiding the deposits in Minkowskie. One of them was an officer called von Stein. He used to stay in the palace (an interior image, pictured) because he had a lover there. Due to its location it was often visited by high-ranking SS officers who treated it like a brothel’

The palace in Minkowskie (archive picture) dates back to the 18th century when it was built by Prussian general Friedrich Wilhelm von Seydlitz

The palace in Minkowskie (archive picture) dates back to the 18th century when it was built by Prussian general Friedrich Wilhelm von Seydlitz

The dig, which starts next week, will take place in the grounds of the 18th century palace in the village of Minkowskie, Poland

The dig, which starts next week, will take place in the grounds of the 18th century palace in the village of Minkowskie, Poland

Last year, the foundation released the location of one of the 11 hiding places identified in the diary, a palace in the village of Roztoka.

Furmaniak told MailOnline: ‘The diary says that the deposits in Roztoka are buried 64 metres at the bottom of a well.

‘It would be a huge task to excavate that site. We are focusing on Minkowskie now because we think it will be easier.’

He added: ‘The recovery of lost works of art and their return to their rightful owners could become a catalyst for changes aimed to bring unity – not polarization. This notion guides our mission.

‘We are preparing to explore another location, which we will start to explore at the same time or just after Minkowskie.

Over the years the palace (archive picture) changed hands several times and after the war the Red Army and the Polish Army were stationed there at different times

Over the years the palace (archive picture) changed hands several times and after the war the Red Army and the Polish Army were stationed there at different times

‘We have all the required permits for carrying out this work.  ‘We are cooperating all the time with the Ministry of Culture and the heritage conservator.’

The lodge that handed over the documents takes its name from Quedlinburg, a small town in Saxony-Anhalt. Quedlinburg members were appointed to top positions in many Nazi-era institutions, most notably the fearsome Waffen SS. Among them was SS monster General Hans Kammler (pictured) who led work on the design of gas chambers and crematoria used in death camps

The lodge that handed over the documents takes its name from Quedlinburg, a small town in Saxony-Anhalt. Quedlinburg members were appointed to top positions in many Nazi-era institutions, most notably the fearsome Waffen SS. Among them was SS monster General Hans Kammler (pictured) who led work on the design of gas chambers and crematoria used in death camps

The lodge that handed over the documents takes its name from Quedlinburg, a small town in Saxony-Anhalt. It dates back to the 10th century and the rule of the first German king Henry the Fowler. SS chief Heinrich Himmler was fascinated by the ruler and believed that he was his reincarnation. In the 1930s, the lodge formed an alliance with Hitler under which it became part of the cultural elite in the Third Reich. The deal protected its own status and gave Hitler’s thuggish brown-shirt movement an air of respectability. It also provided the Nazi project a sense of historical legitimacy. The Nazis used King Henry’s legacy to legitimise their own power, and they held ritual ceremonies at the site of his tomb in Quedlinburg monastery on the anniversary of his death.

Quedlinburg members were appointed to top positions in many Nazi-era institutions, most notably the fearsome Waffen SS. Among them was SS monster General Hans Kammler who led work on the design of gas chambers and crematoria used in death camps. Furmaniak said that the lodge, whose members are descended from the SS, had made the diary and documents available to his foundation as a gesture of atonement for Poland’s suffering at the hands of Germany during the war. In a statement, the foundation said: ‘The return of world heritage is seen as a milestone on the long path of reconciliation.’


Treasure hunters plan to dig up 48 crates of Hitler’s gold worth half a billion hidden under Polish palace ‘brothel’

  • 28 Apr 2021, 11:00

TREASURE hunters are hoping to dig up 48 crates of Hitler’s hidden gold worth nearly half a billion pounds at a Polish palace used by his SS henchmen as a brothel. The team will begin the archeological excavation at the 18th-century palace in the village of Minkowskie in southern Poland next week and hope to unearth 10 tonnes of gold and other riches.

The historical palace in Minkowskie, southern Poland is thought to conceal a treasure trove of the Nazi's loot
The historical palace in Minkowskie, southern Poland is thought to conceal a treasure trove of the Nazi’s lootCredit: Fot.Mariusz Przygoda/Silesian Bridge Foundation
The team hope to find 48 crates of Adolf Hitler's hidden gold which is worth up to half a billion pounds
The team hope to find 48 crates of Adolf Hitler’s hidden gold which is worth up to half a billion pounds Credit: Getty – Contributor

The swag was stolen towards the end of World War Two under the instruction of SS boss Heinrich Himmler, to fund the creation of a Fourth Reich. It is thought to be made up of jewellery and possessions treasured by Germany’s elite who lived in the area and gave the Nazis their valuables to avoid them being snatched by Russia’s advancing Red Army. The elusive ‘Gold of Breslau’, which disappeared from police headquarters in the Polish city of Wroclaw, is also believed to be amongst the hidden loot. The treasure hunters, from the non-profit Silesian Bridge foundation, determined the location after scouring through secret documents, an SS officer’s diary, and a map they received from the offspring of officers who frequented a discreet lodge dating back over 1,000 years. The 10th-century Quedlinburg lodge was created during the rule of the first German King Henry the Fowler – who was fascinating to Himmler, who even believed that he was the King’s reincarnation. Quedlinburg members were awarded high-ranking positions in many Nazi institutions after the two formed an alliance in the Third Reich.

One diary entry claimed the loot was hidden in a trough dug in the orangery of the palace
One diary entry claimed the loot was hidden in a trough dug in the orangery of the palace Credit: POLSKA-org.PL
The diaries were handed over by Quedlinburg descendants as a show of remorse to Poland for their ancestors actions
The diaries were handed over by Quedlinburg descendants as a show of remorse to Poland for their ancestors actions
SS officers treated the Minkowskie palace as a 'brothel'
SS officers treated the Minkowskie palace as a ‘brothel’Credit: Getty

The records were handed over by descendants as “the return of world heritage is seen as a milestone on the long path of reconciliation,” according to the foundation. The uncovered diary, believed to have been written by a high-ranking SS officer under the alias Michaelis, seems to be the key to the buried booty. A pencil-written entry from March 12, 1945, discussing the stash at the palace in Minkowskie reads: “A trough has been dug in the orangery, which is a safe ‘home’ for the delivered chests and containers. Michaelis continued, “48 chests from the Reichsbank, in good condition, were hidden, very well covered with earth and ‘greened’ with still living plants.

“Let providence watch over us.”

The revealing memoir has proved to be quite the treasure map, after it earlier revealed the location of another palace in the region last year where 28 tonnes of valuables are believed to be buried at the bottom of a well. But the Silesian Bridge team have opted to excavate the Minkowskie mansion as the stash is easier to access. Among the other indicative documents is a letter from a senior SS officer by the name of von Stein, written to a female who worked at the palace who later became his lover. “My dear Inge, I will fufill my assignment, with God’s will. Some transports were successful. The remaining 48 heavy Reichsbank’s chests and all the family chests I hereby entrust to you,” he wrote.

The grand palace later became a council office, a nursery, and even a cinema
The grand palace later became a council office, a nursery, and even a cinema Credit: POLSKA-org.pl
The diaries and documents have proved the key lead in the hunt for Hitler's treasure
The diaries and documents have proved the key lead in the hunt for Hitler’s treasureCredit: Śląski Pomost Quedlinburg
Chief of the Gestapo Heinrich Himmler ordered the seizure of the valuables towards the end of World War Two
Chief of the Gestapo Heinrich Himmler ordered the seizure of the valuables towards the end of World War Two Credit: Getty – Contributor
The diaries also revealed other potential sites where the Nazi's hid their spoils
The diaries also revealed other potential sites where the Nazi’s hid their spoilsCredit: Fot.Mariusz Przygoda/Silesian Bridge Foundation

“Only you know where they are located. May God help you and help me, fulfil my assignment.”

It is a hint of what Hitler’s monstrous henchmen got up to in their free time and an indication of the masses of loot stolen by the Nazis. “Several people took part in hiding the deposits in Minkowskie. One of them was an officer called von Stein,” Head of the Silesian Bridge foundation, Roman Furmaniak, told the MailOnline. “He used to stay in the palace because he had a lover there. Due to its location it was often visited by high-ranking SS officers who treated it like a brothel.” He convinced Inge to keep a watchful eye over the treasure, who happily obliged because “she was in love with the handsome officer in a black SS uniform”. “They were like gods,” Furmaniak continued. “She believed that she would have to stay there for a year, maybe two, then it would all be over. “There was a two-month period in 1945 when she had to hide in the forest from the Russians. But when she got back, the area had not been disturbed. “If they had dug a hole, they would have taken what they wanted and then left the hole. We have seen this in history many times in Poland.”

The excavation is set to begin next week
The excavation is set to begin next week Credit: Fot.Mariusz Przygoda/Silesian Bridge Foundation
The pencil-written diary entries are believed to be written by a high-ranking SS officer
The pencil-written diary entries are believed to be written by a high-ranking SS officer Credit: Fot. Mariusz Przygoda / Silesian Bridge Foundation
Around 600,000 pieces of artwork were stolen across Europe during Hitler's ruleThe non profit foundation want to use the diaries to help return the treasures to the rightful owners

The region eventually came under the control of the Russians at the end of the war, who ousted the German settlers amid the return of Poles who had taken refuge in Western Ukraine coming back. Inge adapted her appearance and identity to conceal herself among the new population, even marrying a local man, while watching over the treasure until her death 60 years later. The Minkowskie palace, built by Prussian general Friedrich Wilhelm von Seydlitz, was later a station for the Red Army and the Polish Army. The historical building was later used as a local council office, a nursery and even a cinema, before the Silesian Bridge foundation took a long-term lease on the property. “The recovery of lost works of art and their return to their rightful owners could become a catalyst for changes aimed to bring unity – not polarisation. This notion guides our mission,” Furmaniak said. The fascist regime stole around 600,000 pieces of prized artwork from across Europe, amounting to billions of pounds.

WHERE ARE THEY?

Police hunt mum, 26, who vanished with three-year-old son from Leeds home.

Many pieces remain missing – including the infamous priceless collection of amber panels, known as the Amber Room and nicknamed the ‘Eighth Wonder of the World’. Estimated to be worth somewhere between £120-£240 million in modern day currency, the Russian artefact was looted by the Nazis and put on display back in Germany – before disappearing towards the end of the war. Regarded as one of the greatest mysteries of the war, some obsessive treasure hunters have lost their lives searching for the Amber Room – which remains undiscovered.

The elusive 'Gold of Breslau' is also believed to be hidden with the gold
The elusive ‘Gold of Breslau’ is also believed to be hidden with the gold Credit: Fot.Mariusz Przygoda/Silesian Bridge Foundation
The Nazis were known for burying their valuables and secrets deep underground, and also used the subterranean systems (pictured) to travel through
The Nazis were known for burying their valuables and secrets deep underground, and also used the subterranean systems (pictured) to travel through Credit: AP:Associated Press

Inside global hunt for Hitler’s lost £20BILLION Nazi gold horde with sunken ships, hidden bunkers & a buried train

  • Adrian Zorzut
  • 30 Apr 2021, 11:53

TREASURE hunters the world over are scrambling to uncover the secret locations believed to have been used by Nazi officers to hide stolen loot in the dying days of World War 2. From sunken shipwrecks, to buried trains, and hidden bunkers – the global gold rush for the rumoured Nazi fortune spans from Argentina, to Europe, to the depths of the Atlantic.

Nazi loot is suspected to include gold, religious relics and priceless paintings
Nazi loot is suspected to include gold, religious relics and priceless paintingsCredit: Getty – Contributor

Hitler and his evil empire are known to pillaged gold, jewels and other treasures such as priceless artwork as they stormed across Europe and Russia. It is believed it was stashed with the intention of the Nazis to collect it and potentially fund the resurgence of a new Fourth Reich. And despite some of this being recovered, much of it remains lost – with speculative figures of its value range from several million to up to £20billion. With this tantalising promise of fame and fortune, real life Indiana Jones treasure seekers have sought to uncover the hidden locations for decades. Many believe the motherload is still out there, and these dreams were inflamed last year by the discovery of a diary allegedly written by an SS officer using the pseudonym “Michaelis”. It laid out a plan outlined by by SS boss Heinrich Himmler to hide stolen European treasure in the dying days of the war – although the authenticity of the diary has not been verified. So with renewed passion, the gold rush for the hidden Nazi treasure is on once again – and The Sun Online can now reveal some of the locations believed to be hiding Hitler’s fortune.

Minkowskie, Poland

Treasure hunters are hoping to dig up 48 crates of gold at a palace in Minkowskie, Poland
Treasure hunters are hoping to dig up 48 crates of gold at a palace in Minkowskie, PolandCredit: Fot.Mariusz Przygoda/Silesian Bridge Foundation

One team of treasure hunters are hoping to dig up 48 crates of gold worth nearly half a billion pounds at a Polish palace used by SS henchmen. The Silesian Bridge foundation, a non-for-profit body set up to find Nazi loot, are seeking to uncovered 10 tonnes of gold believed to have come from the Reichsbank and from a Polish police quarters. The group is basing their search off an entry by Michaelis from March 12, 1945, discussing the stash at a mansion in Minkowskie, southern Poland – and they are hoping to unearth the treasure next week. It is hoped there could be up to 48 chests of gold worth up to £500million could be hidden at the palace, which was used a brothel by the SS.

Hochberg Palace, Roztoka, Poland

A well at the 16th century Hochberg Palace in southern Poland is believed to contain billions of euros of gold
A well at the 16th century Hochberg Palace in southern Poland is believed to contain billions of euros of goldCredit: Alamy

Michaelis’ entries also name an abandoned well nearly 200 feet (60 metres) below the 16th-century Hochberg Palace in Roztoka, southwest Poland. The gold at the bottom of the well is thought to also have come from the Reichsbank in the Polish town of Breslau (now Wrocław) and is estimated to be worth billions of euros, Polish news channel TFN reported. The palace lies in Lower Silesia, an area in Poland well known as the location for Nazi  goods stolen from wealthy Jewish families, and art looted from museums and galleries. The area is riddled with caves, mines and tunnels, “as well as castles and palaces with cavernous dungeons,” which offered the Nazis plenty of hiding places for even very large works of art, according to the polish minister of culture and national heritage.

Hartenstein Hills, Dresden, Germany

The Amber Room is the crown jewel of missing Nazi treasures
The Amber Room is the crown jewel of missing Nazi treasures

In 2017, a group of amateur sleuths claimed they had found the missing Amber Room of the Russian Tsars inside a cave in the Hartenstein hills near Dresden, Germany. The Amber Room is considered the crown jewel of the missing Nazi treasure haul after it was stolen from Catherine Palace near St Petersburg. Before its loss, it was considered an “Eight Wonder of the World” – bedecked with amber panels, gold leaf, gemstones and ornate statues when it was built in 1701. Homeopath Leonhard Blume, 73, scientist Günter Eckardt, 67, and georadar specialist Peter Lohr, 71, used specialist radar imaging to detect what appeared to be an underground bunker and booby traps. The trio believe the room had been used as a hideout by Nazi officers, and may be the resting place of the Amber Room.

Bavaria

76-year-old Hans Glueck believed £500m of Nazi loot is hidden in a Bavarian forest based on a treasure map he found
76-year-old Hans Glueck believed £500m of Nazi loot is hidden in a Bavarian forest based on a treasure map he found

In the same year, 76-year-old Hans Glueck pinpointed a possible stash worth £500million in a Bavarian wood. He spent 20 years hunting the haul, and believes it is full of gold, diamonds, artworks and rare stamps – much of which was looted from Jews by the Nazis during the Holocaust. Unfortunately, Glueck has been unable to excavate the treasure due to a falling out with the landowner, whose permission he needs to extract it. Glueck used a map handed down by a senior Nazi in charge of transporting a trainload of loot from Berlin Reichsbank to the Alps.

Walbrzych, Poland

A Nazi train loaded with treasure is believed to be near the small Polish town of Walbrzych
A Nazi train loaded with treasure is believed to be near the small Polish town of WalbrzychCredit: JANEK SKARZYNSKI

The small Polish town of Walbrzych is said to be the resting place of a train filled with treasure worth around a billion pounds, according to sources in 2015. After consulting historians, the town’s authorities believe a fortune in gold, paintings and precious gems lies aboard a 330ft-long set of carriages hidden underground. The Nazis left nothing to chance and are believed to have rigged the train with explosives and nerve gas.

Wrecks of SS Minden and MV Wilhelm Gustloff

£100m of gold is believed to have sunk off Iceland on the SS Minden
£100m of gold is believed to have sunk off Iceland on the SS MindenCredit: Wiki commons

UK-based Advanced Marine Services claimed it found four tonnes of gold from South American banks in the post room of the SS Minden, which sank in 1939. The gold, thought to be worth £100million, was believed to be on board the ship and headed to Germany when the boat sank 120 miles southeast of Iceland on September 24, 1939. Minden’s captain scuttled his ship on orders from Adolf Hitler after it was spotted by British cruisers.

MV Wilhelm Gustloff was sunk by the Soviets in the final days of WW2
MV Wilhelm Gustloff was sunk by the Soviets in the final days of WW2Credit: Getty – Contributor

Meanwhile, another theory claims the Nazi gold may be hiding in the wreck of the MV Wilhelm Gustloff. It has been speculated some £100million worth of gold bars and parts of the Amber Room could have gone down with the ship when it was sunk by the Soviets. The vessel now has international war grave status after 9,400 died when it went down, which means no-one can dive within 50 metres of the wreck.

Patagonia, Argentina

Millions of pounds worth of gold was smuggled to Patagonia, in Argentina in the last days of WWII
Millions of pounds worth of gold was smuggled to Patagonia, in Argentina in the last days of WWIICredit: Getty – Contributor

The Third Reich is believed to have smuggled millions of pounds worth of gold to Argentina in the last days of the war as the Nazis sought to flee. German U-boats alleged transported loot from the dying Nazi regime to Patagonia, in Argentina, according to documentary makers. 2004 film Oro Nazi En Agrentina (Nazi Gold In Argentina) claimed that Swiss banks, Roman Catholic bishops and Argentine politicians helped to plunder hundreds of millions of dollars in Hitler’s treasures.

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