When it comes to world history, taking a trip down memory lane is never a bad idea.

There are a number of significant events in the past that helped shape the present world we are living. Thanks to the photos that have stood the test of time, we are given a clearer picture of what took place years, decades, and even centuries ago. 

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In this gallery of unseen historic photos, you will find snippets of what you have learned in school as well as the little moments that were never included in the books. However they vary, each of them has a unique story to tell. Keep scrolling for a major throwback experience.

Workers cut a tree, 1800s

Believe it or not, this vintage photo of working on the upper branches of trees is real! They were pruning it to bear more fruits and continue growing. For children reading this, please don’t try it at home. Those men may look cool trimming trees up there, but they were putting their lives on the line. Besides, they were professionals so they knew what they were doing. 

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Obviously, if you wanted this gig, you had to make sure you were not afraid of heights and were very much aware of the risks. Given the size of the tree, this was a big time operation. It practically needed an entire team to do the pollaring. 

A steelworker hangs out at the future Empire State Building, 1930

This rare photo makes us want to give a salute to two people. The first one is for this steelworker, and the second one is for the photographer. Such brave souls! They were doing the dangerous job not everyone could— especially for those who had fear of heights. How do the people behind the lens even capture photos like this?

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For photographer Lewis Hine, he was just doing his job to document the construction of the Empire State Building. He had to be creative as the construction got higher though, so he stood in a designed basket that swung out 1,000 feet above Fifth Avenue. Without the steelworkers, the iconic skyscraper would not exist at all and without the photographers, we wouldn’t be able to honor these people. 

New York nurses holds a set of triplets, 1946

This reaction was what happened back when ultrasound was still nowhere in sight. Then again, Dad here could just be overreacting. While he was being a little too dramatic, perhaps he was genuinely surprised to know he’s not only having a baby, not even two, but three children in one go! 

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Meanwhile, the nurses in this image need some recognition, too. From big moments like the war to special moments like childbirth, they have always been there to lend a hand. We have to note that these were times when some equipment were still not invented so just imagine the amount of work they were put through. 

A man advertises himself during the Depression, 1930s

The Great Depression is a significant topic that we discussed in school. However, we would always focus on the bigger picture and forget to zoom in the lens on those actually affected. We know for a fact that the stock market crashed in 1929, and that it struck the workforce. Still, it hits different when you see photos like this. 

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Being able to earn during the Great Depression was like winning the lottery. Unfortunately for this man, he was still searching for one so he had to be creative in getting the attention of possible employers. This fellow was not alone and was just a representation of many skilled Americans at the time. 

17 year-old girl survives a plane crash, 1971

It’s totally understandable if you do not get what was happening here. It doesn’t capture everything, but this was a actually a young woman who just survived a plane crash. In 1971, Juliane Koepcke was only 17 years old when she was sucked out of an airplane after it was struck by a lighting bolt. ADVERTISEMENT

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The only silver lining on this incident was that Koepcke made it in the Amazon Jungle as she was still strapped to her seat. She managed to find a bag of candy to eat for sustenance. Koepcke was discovered by forestry workers after 11 days. 

90-year-old Czech Grandma paints houses

Anežka Kašpárková, the woman in the photo, is someone we should follow in the footsteps of. She’s 90 and she doesn’t seem to have a life crisis at all. The old lady is contented painting beautiful murals in the Czech village of Louka. She started practicing her artwork after retiring from agriculture work.

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These Moravian paintings are proof that Kašpárková is indeed an artist but she remains modest about it, “I’m just doing what I like. I try to help decorate the world a bit. I am not an artist. I just do what I like.” Keep doing what you like, grandma!

An 18 year-old Madonna poses for the camera, 1976

Today, we honor Madonna as the Queen of Pop, but decades back, she was your regular college student. She used to attend at the University of Michigan and studied dance after class. After two years, the music legend left the uni life and moved to New York City in 1978. 

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The Big Apple was really not that big for Madonna. She knew what she wanted and that was to dance. She even enrolled in classes at the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre. The Queen of Pop would rise to fame in just four years. 

Troops gather at the Normandy Beach, 1944

This black and white photo calls for us brush up on our history. On June 6, 1944, there were more than 150,000 American, British and Canadian troops that marched through the beaches of Normandy for the anticipated D-Day. Can you imagine getting three military forces together on board? It took months of planning to enact one of the most intense amphibious military assaults ever.

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As the mind would recall, northern France were freed from the Nazis thanks to this military action that took place from June to August of that year. It marked the beginning of the end of World War II. The war would be over by the same time next year. The kids record the “Peanuts” characters’ voice, 1960s

The kids record the “Peanuts” characters’ voice, 1960s

One of the flak that TV shows receive from their audiences today is misrepresentation. There are adults who portray high school students, and then there are other nationalities who play a specific race. Back in the 1960s, Peanuts creator Charles Schultz already knew it was important to have the voices of actual children on the animated adaptation of his comic strip. 

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Since kids are still limited to their abilities, one of the kid actors, Todd Barbee, revealed that an adult may have filled in for him in one scene, “One time they wanted me to voice that ‘AAAAAAARRRRRGGGGG’… Try as I might, I just couldn’t generate… so after something like 25 takes, we moved on… I think they eventually got an adult or a kid with an older voice to do that one take.”

 Two photos of the same Aldabra that are 115 years apart 

At first glance, you’d think the only similarities of these photos is that it features turtles. In reality, the tortoise is the same one and he’s the oldest! Jonathan is an Aldabra giant tortoise born in 1832. The photo on the left was taken in 1902, while the photo on the right was taken in 2017. Can you believe he is now 188 years old? 

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If you’re as fascinated as us, perhaps it’s time to book a flight to the land of Saint Helena in the South Atlantic Ocean. There you will find our favorite terrestrial animal chillin’ like a villain. Although he’s been around for quite some time now, Jonathan’s yet to produce an offspring. The life expectancy of a giant tortoise is around 150 years. Our boy Jonathan is clearly beating the average, so we believe he can still be a dad!

A 14-year-old Princess Elizabeth stares at the camera, 1940

Does this 14-year-old girl look familiar to you? That’s because she is currently the most prominent figure in the United Kingdom. Queen Elizabeth may be a full-time monarch right now, but decades ago, she was just a normal teenage girl. Who are we kidding— she was always destined to be a queen. 

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In 2020, Her Majesty addressed the people for the 75th anniversary of VE Day. Back in 1940, she did her first radio broadcast to address the children affected by the blitzkrieg, “We are trying to do all we can to help our gallant sailors, soldiers and airmen, and we are trying, too, to bear our share of the danger and sadness of war. We know, every one of us, that in the end all will be well.”

A beggar runs alongside a carriage carrying King George V

From 1910 until his demise in 1936, Queen Elizabeth’s grandfather King George V took the reins over England. During his sovereignty, the King had to deal with the first world war and manage the local problems in the country at the same time. 

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This never-before-seen image shows how His Majesty sported the late-Victorian style despite developments in fashion and technology. He rode in a carriage. A poor chap ran along and begged for some change. Unfortunately, neither the King nor his friends were reaching for their pockets. 

A 4,850 year-old Californian bristlecone pine tree

Sometimes, other historical events give us an idea on other past happenings. So if something is deemed older than the Egyptian pyramids, then it’s obvious that it is really old. This Californian bristlecone pine tree nicknamed ‘Methuselah’ was seeded in the year 2833 BC. We did the math and it makes Methuselah 4,850 years old.

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Professor of botany, Robert Mohlenbrock, shared his ideas on four-thousand-year-old tree, “Any organism that lived longer than the norm had to have optimal conditions going for it … that would mean moderate temperatures, shelter from extreme weather, and plenty of moisture and nutrients.”

Barbara Walters leafs through some papers, 1949

Barbara Walters was a legendary journalist in the 20th century. Before taking the spotlight though, she was just a college student studying English at Sarah Lawrence College in Yonkers, New York. After earning a B.A. degree in 1951, the fresh graduate moved to New York City and started working for an advertising agency.

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Walters then snagged a position at a local NBC affiliate. For years, the budding broadcaster produced programs at NBC then moved to CBS in 1955. It did not take long before she took a job at The Today Show. 

Jean Bugatti poses with the Bugatti Type 41, 1932

This colorized photograph should put a smile on the face of anyone who loves anything about automobiles. It shows Jean Bugatti posing beside one his father’s coolest works. Ettore Bugatti’s plan was to earn loads of dollars by selling the Bugatti Type 41 Royale Esders Roadster to the members of the royalty. However, that plan wouldn’t pan out in the middle of the Great Depression. 

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Apparently, the European monarchs were not inclined on the idea to burn some money on the luxury car during the economic depression. He initially wanted to build 25 models of the Bugatti Royale, but only seven of these cars were ever produced.ADVERTISEMENT

Paparazzi surrounds Governor Bill Clinton’s cat, 1992

Thanks to the internet, there are many pet celebrities now although back in the ’90s, Socks the cat was the press’ favorite. That’s because he was the White House’s “first pet” at the tim.. This political animal adopted by Governor Bill Clinton was the most popular purry friend in the 1992 presidential race.ADVERTISEMENT

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Naturally, Socks lived a better life than most people. He had his own video game, he was on the children’s version of the White House website, and he anwered mails. Of course, the Republicans were enraged. They questioned how much of the taxpayers’ money was being allotted on the person answering letters to children under the guise of a cat. ADVERTISEMENT

A man explains the sizes of the donut hole

Without looking at the presentation the guy was discussing, one would think it was a serious business. Perhaps it really was a life-and-death situation for them. Apparently, some people were concerned with the size of the donut hole that they documented the changes made to it. ADVERTISEMENT

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The culprit behind this major hole issue were donut machines. They started punching smaller because unlike earlier donuts, they don’t need as much space to dry. It’s also possible that donut chains have instituted a standard size. Regardless, we will now be vigilant with our donut holes.ADVERTISEMENT

A woman uses the first Siemens vacuum cleaner, 1906

If there’s one thing that adults are thankful for today, it’s the development in technology especially in home appliances. Can you imagine hauling this enormous machine around the house just to suck up some crumbs? Since you don’t deem this mechanized monster to be called a vacuum cleaner, Siemens actually referred to it as “dedusting pumps.” Cool. ADVERTISEMENT

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Given the dedusting pumps’ hefty weight and limited horsepower, it is more likely that people today would choose to clean without using it. As mentioned, we really have to be grateful that the current version doesn’t weigh as much as a car.ADVERTISEMENT

A boy reads in a destroyed London bookshop, 1940

A British boy devouring a book at a shop after a bombing raid? What a powerful photo. During the World War II, the United Kingdom fell victim to the wrath of the German army. From July to December of 1940, they went after civilian areas, killing 23,000 innocent lives.ADVERTISEMENT

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It was clearly a life far from normal, but the English people did everything they could to thrive. They would hide underground then return to their favorite places—completely blown out—after a few days. ADVERTISEMENT

A female Lockheed employee works on a P-38 Lightning, 1944 

This striking image goes out to the women who empower and need to be empowered. If there is, in any little way, a positive thing that the second world war has brought, it was an opportunity for women at the time to be hired in industries that initially discriminated them. ADVERTISEMENT

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There was an enormous demand for the Allied cause in Europe so companies like Lockheed gave space for women into their factories. When World War II began, the aeronautics industry needed work. This circumstance also jumpstarted concepts like daycare centers adjacent to factories.ADVERTISEMENT

A man looks for books in Cincinnati’s old main library

The old Public library was the stuff of dreams for bookworms and academics. From 1875 to 1955, the beautiful structure in Cincinnati served as a haven for those who wanted to read. This library would have also been “Instagrammable” in the modern times with its cast iron book alcoves, spiral staircases, checker marble floors, and a skylight that doesn’t need any filter.ADVERTISEMENT

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Unfortunately for millennials, all they could do is photoshop themselves in the surviving photos of the old Public library. In 1955, upon construction of a newer building a few blocks away, this classic building was unceremoniously demolished.ADVERTISEMENT

A rare 1947 Labatt Brewing Co. Streamliner

Brands today should take their marketing cues from older businesses such as the Labatt Brewing Company. The Canadian company came up with the Labatt “Streamliner” since they couldn’t advertise their delicious beer on a poster or in a magazine. ADVERTISEMENT

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Despite the Prohibition in Ontario ending in 1927, beer advertisements were still prohibited in the media. Good thing the brewing company had a team of marketing geniuses so they decided to spend their budget on that. Labatt tapped engineering and art expert Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky to help design the streamliner. ADVERTISEMENT

19-year-old Jimi Hendrix trains in the US army, 1961

Sometimes famous artists surprise you with their past lives. Before Jimi Hendrix was playing as a guitar god, he was training as a paratrooper in the US army. It’s not that he wanted to patriotically serve the country. It’s that joining the military was a better choice than serving time in prison for car theft.ADVERTISEMENT

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Hendrix opened up about his army experience though a letter to his father saying, “There’s nothing but physical training and harassment here for two weeks, then when you go to jump school, that’s when you get hell. They work you to DEATH, fussing and fighting.”ADVERTISEMENT

A young and cool Walt Disney strikes a pose, 1920s

Just when you thought the guy on the photo was a regular dapper man in the ’20s, you realize he is actually THE Walt Disney himself. This legend began as a starving artist and a struggling businessman. One of his first projects was ” “Laugh-O-Grams,” a modern version of fairy tales that were played in Newman Theater in Kansas City. ADVERTISEMENT

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In 1923, Disney moved to Hollywood to be with his brother Roy and to try and sell his reel film based on Alice in Wonderland. Five years later, he created his most iconic character, Mickey Mouse. The rest, as they say, is history.ADVERTISEMENT

Police stops the NYC traffic for a cat and her kitten, 1925 

No matter who you are or what fancy car you are driving in the 1920s, if a cat wants to cross the New York streets, you have no choice but to comply. The traffic enforcer was there to make sure of it. The job entails managing the traffic and assisting pedestrians. This policeman went overboard just to help a mama cat and her kitten cross the street. ADVERTISEMENT

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What spectators also have to know is the fact that photographer Harry Warnecke was actually late to the scene so he missed the initial crossing. The cop and cat happily obliged to recreate the scene to have this wonderful photo. ADVERTISEMENT

People line up outside Al Capone’s free soup kitchen, 1931

Call it a PR stunt or a change of heart, but Al Capone seemed to have set it out for the less fortunate people than him. During the Great Depression, the crime boss established the Chicago based shelter and food bank. This helped a lot of unemployed and hungry people to get a warm meal.ADVERTISEMENT

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As mentioned, there are some who classified this act as a publicity stunt. If it ever was, it surely did not only benefit Capone’s cause, but also those who actually needed food. The soup kitchen served free breakfast, lunch, and dinner during the cold winter months in Illinois.ADVERTISEMENT

Albert Einstein wears a pair of fuzzy slippers, 1950s

It doesn’t take a genius to be stylish as this genius effortlessly did so in the ’50s. Albert Einstein sure didn’t want to waste time and brainpower choosing his outfit of the day, but his footwear choice makes us wonder if he spent some of his precious minutes and energy to wear it. ADVERTISEMENT

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As this fluffy fair gives us a sense of comfort, we hope it also helped calm his mind and focus on more important things such as the theory of relativity and the meaning of life. ADVERTISEMENT

An arctic explorer offers canned milk to a polar bear, 1980

While some would argue that every man is for himself in the wildlife, this Russian soldier would beg to disagree. The -40 degrees Fahrenheit weather did not stop him from helping people and even animals in need. He was one of the men on a routine military expedition in the Chukchi Peninsula who offered condensed milk to the polar bear parent.  ADVERTISEMENT

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This heartwarming moment wasn’t an isolated case. The Russian soldiers would usually open the cans of condensed milk so the starving bears could proceed to lick it clean and then feed their cubs. The Soviet winter reunites everyone including poor animals.ADVERTISEMENT

Infants sleep in the open air at a maternity hospital in Moscow, 1958

Don’t mind this vintage photo, it’s just three rows of newborns taking a nap outside in the freezing weather. Seriously speaking though, the practice of having children sleep in the cold weather was a normal routine in Russia. Apparently, it stems from an odd tradition. ADVERTISEMENT

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If this happened in other countries, the babies would be snatched away from their parents in a heartbeat. However for the Russians, they believe this is the best way to prepare the little ones for the country’s harsh conditions. Before putting the children in minus 10 degree Celsius weather for a nap, Russian mothers would dress them in a hat and stockings. ADVERTISEMENT

A classic Hoover ad, 1953

It’s no secret that most advertising agencies in the early 1900s perpetrated gender roles and had stereotypes. In the ’60s, ads like this image insinuated that women absolutely loved doing house work. Although in recent times, any adult would appreciate a fine piece of equipment as a Christmas present. ADVERTISEMENT

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If only this advertisement did not insinuate prejudiced beliefs, the theme colors, the illustration, and the font would make up for a great publicity material. It probably convinced a lot of consumers to purchase the Hoover vacuum.ADVERTISEMENT

Last prisoners leave Alcatraz, 1963

Many decades have already passed since the Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary stopped operating, but it still fascinates a lot of because of its spectacular structure and stories. The prison was practically built for prisoners who wreaked havoc at other facilities. At the time it was known as escape proof because it was strategically placed in the cold waters and strong currents of San Francisco Bay.ADVERTISEMENT

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Unfortunately, it came to a point where the government could not afford the Alcatraz any longer. After a 1962 escape attempt, the prison was shut down and the prisoners were dispersed to various Federal prisons across the country. Alcatraz only operated from 1934 to 1963, so those who were able to visit probably had more idea how it felt. ADVERTISEMENT

Mildred Burke wrestles over 200 men and loses to only one

Mildred Burke gave wrestling enthusiasts a run for their money back then. She was just 18 years old when she fell in love with professional wrestling. Rumor has it that the strong woman was only able to convince local wrestling promoter Billy Wolfe to train her by body slamming one of his wrestlers. ADVERTISEMENT

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In an unexpected turn of events, Burke and Wolfe did not only train together but also fell in love and tied the knot in the process. From the 1930s, the female wrestler won over 200 men and only lost to one throughout her time in the ring. Burke founded World Women’s Wrestling Associated in the 1950s.ADVERTISEMENT

Bob Hope, John Wayne, Ronald Reagan, Dean Martin, and Frank Sinatra, 1975

If the 21st century had the iconic Oscars selfie to boast of, the preceding century had this star-studded group photo. Bob Hope, John Wayne, Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra, and Ronald Reagan were photographed on a night where they would roast the latter. No worries though, it’s all clean fun for the then Governor of California. They were just ridiculing the future President of the United States. ADVERTISEMENT

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As it turns out, the fancy occasion was actually the coming out party of Reagan. People couldn’t help but compare him with Richard Nixon, who was already unpopular to them at the time. Nixon was a good sport that night though, laughing along at the jokes made about him.ADVERTISEMENT

Mount St. Helens erupts, 1980

Contrary to what many would think, this is not just a massive cloud formation on a random day. It was actually a scene from the eruption of Mount St. Helens in Skamania County, Washington back in 1980. The devastating event was somehow expected because there had already been a series of earthquakes around two months before the explosion. St. Helens was also spewing steam so it was just a matter of when. ADVERTISEMENT

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A magnitude 5.1 earthquake that passed through directly under the mountain caused the largest rockslide in history. The destruction cost caused caused by the eruption was nearly $1.1 billion.  ADVERTISEMENT

The beautiful colors of Maine during fall 

One thing that has remained in Maine throughout these years is its breathtaking view during fall. Even before drinking pumpkin spice latte was a trend for that season, taking coffee and basking at the picturesque scene was the dream. The trees changes its leaves to the most beautiful colors. The cold air would also make you want to spend evenings just sitting in front of the fire. ADVERTISEMENT

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What’s wonderful about this photo is that you can still relive it in the present. Go on long hikes and spend evenings on the lake together with your friends. Did we mention the abundance of apples, gourds, and pumpkins? If you’re not on a diet, there are also lots of lobsters. ADVERTISEMENT

Visiting physicians document a Brazilian girl 

The woman in this historical photo is Maria de Jesus. She was born in 1964 in the Gerais state of Brazil. Many scientists and medical professionals documented who were in the region at the time documented her physical condition. ADVERTISEMENT

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Despite all their efforts to identify her condition, no one could come up with an explanation to her appearance. What they knew was that Maria looked different from her family. They took note of her simian characteristics.ADVERTISEMENT

The Dark Hedges in Northern Ireland

TV audiences who have seen the hit HBO series  Game of Thrones might recognize these spine-chilling trees. Known as the Dark Hedges, it is located on a grim road somewhere near the town of Ballymoney in Northern Ireland. The eerie spot is composed of beech trees with their twisted branches arched over the road.ADVERTISEMENT

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No worries for those who plan to visit the Dark Hedges. It may look super spooky but it is actually surrounded by fields. Besides, the road is one of the most photographed in the Irish countryside, so you will probably never be alone when you visit it.ADVERTISEMENT

The Duke of York tries on a slide, 1925

If the Duke of York doesn’t look like he was having the time of his life, that’s because he wasn’t. The British monarch may have been born with a silver spoon but he was still dealt a bad hand. Later to be called King George VI, the duke used to have a terrible stammer. One time, he gave a speech at the Wembley Exhibition that took him hours to get through.ADVERTISEMENT

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Thanks to George’s speech therapist Lionel Logue, he was able to cure his condition. His Majesty became a pro at delivering speeches. Needless to say, most of his speeches before becoming a King were either destroyed or hidden. ADVERTISEMENT

The magnificent scenery of the French Alps

It looks unreal but it most certainly is! This jaw-dropping view is brought to you by the French Alps. Except for those residing in the area, it goes beyond anyone’s imagination. This picturesque piece of land makes a convincing case to leave everything behind and just live in the European mountains. Imagine how breathtaking it would be to witness it in person. ADVERTISEMENT

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There’s totally no judgment coming from us if you want to let out a yodel. Just be careful as it might trigger an unwanted avalanche. Also, France may be a bit of a credit-grabber for calling it the “French Alps.” Many of the alps are actually shared with Switzerland and Italy. ADVERTISEMENT

The Maryland house inspires The Blair Witch Project

This hair-raising image looks like it was taken straight out of a horror film but that is maybe because the haunting house actually inspired the 1999 film The Blair Witch Project. Naturally, it is considered one of the most intensely terrifying films of the decade. Located in Burkittsville, Maryland, just looking at this area can give you the creeps.ADVERTISEMENT

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So it is not that shocking to find out that filmmakers had literal nightmares after checking out the house. It also does not help that there are stories about that “Spook Hill” an area that’s allegedly haunted by Civil War era ghosts. There’s supposedly a creepy figure roaming around the woods at night. How scary!ADVERTISEMENT

The Montparnasse derails, 1895

In case you are one of those who find themselves always running late, remember to slow down. The 1895 story goes that the Granville–Paris Express was already behind schedule, so the driver gunned it entering the station. The air brake failed to stop so the train ended up crashing through a wall. Yikes!ADVERTISEMENT

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As a result, there was one fatality. Of the 31 passengers, six of them were badly bruised. While almost everyone on the Granville–Paris Express survived, the driver was fined 50 francs. ADVERTISEMENT

The Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapses due to high winds

In 1940, tragedy struck in the state of Washington after the Tacoma Narrows Bridge completely fell. It was truly a shock as it had only been four months since the structure was completed. An “aeroelastic flutter “caused the destruction of the suspension bridge.ADVERTISEMENT

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Crash survivor Leonard Coatsworth shared his horrifying experience with the Tacoma News Tribune. “Around me I could hear concrete cracking. I started back to the car to get the dog, but was thrown before I could reach it. The car itself began to slide from side to side on the roadway. I decided the bridge was breaking up and my only hope was to get back to shore,” he said. ADVERTISEMENT

The Vespa 150 TAP carries a recoilless rifle

Taking down enemies has never been more fashionable with the emergence of the Vespa 150 TAP. The Italian scooter was transformed into a military weapon. It was modified by creating a hole in the legshield to carry a M20 75mm recoilless rifle.ADVERTISEMENT

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The French paratroops used the Vespa 150 TAP as an anti-tank scooter. Looks can be deceiving though, so these bad boys may have looked super cool but seeing the artillery, the scooter would have been heavy.ADVERTISEMENT

Harriet Tubman in her later years, 1911

Harriet Tubman was an American abolitionist and political activist who remained wise in her later years. “Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world,” she once said. ADVERTISEMENT

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Tubman survived even though the odds were against her most of the time. She escaped slavery from Maryland in 1949. She started risking her life to help hundreds of people be free from slavery and the plantation system, too. Tubman also worked as a cook and nurse for the Union Army. As if that wasn’t enough, she even spied for the North during the war.ADVERTISEMENT

Young shoe shiners hear the Civil War veteran’s tales, 1935

Shoe shining was a frequent job in the early twentieth century. The shoe shiners were referred to as boot blacks. Walking down the streets, you would run into several young men with a box and rag. They would offer to make your shoes look as good as new for a fair price. It was their way to earn a wage as youth. ADVERTISEMENT

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Every corner of the street was occupied by boot blacks who wanted to score some dollars or some gossip. In this photo, they gathered to listen to the stories about the last half of the 1800s. The world was already changing at the time so hearing those tales felt enthralling. ADVERTISEMENT

Engineers at a DEC customer site, 1971

Can this old photo scream more of the ’70s decade? We doubt it. The the engineer’ strange haircuts, the striped pants, wide ties, and chunky shoes they were wearing, and those giant computers are more than enough to take you back to the disco era. ADVERTISEMENT

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In all seriousness though, the professionals in the picture were actually checking out a Digital Equipment Corporations (DEC) customer site on a Programmed Data Processor (PDP) computer. Looking at this photo will make you realize how far we’ve come in terms of technology. ADVERTISEMENT

A Fijian man poses for the camera, 1895

Fiji is a country that one can find in the South Pacific. The archipelago is composed of over 300 islands. Europeans are more familiar with since the continent came across Fiji as early as the 1700s. Throughout the decades, they visited the Fijians to trade sea cucumbers and sandalwood. ADVERTISEMENT

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Having lived in an island country, the people of Fiji gained a reputation of being the experts are building canoes in the South Pacific. Not only that, they have a large amount of sugarcane. Unfortunately, the British colonized Fiji from 1895 to 1970.ADVERTISEMENT

Steve McQueen drives his Convertible, 1963

One of the things that established Steve McQueen as a cool guy was his vast collection of luxury cars. The movie star purchased the sickest automobiles. It could have been influenced by his role in the 1968 film Bullitt. This Jaguar F-Type Convertible was a huge deal because it was incredibly rare.ADVERTISEMENT

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Perfect with that looking-back-at-camera shot, McQueen was photographed behind the wheels of the world’s first supercar in California. The famous actor looked effortlessly handsome. He was fond of driving fast, which got him in trouble more often than not. ADVERTISEMENT

The Klementinum Library is located in Prague

When it comes to architecture, Europe has plenty of countries and cities to highlight. The city of Prague in Czech Republic in particular has the Klementinum. It is a complex of beautiful buildings where you can find the National University and Technical libraries. Among the impressive libraries is the Baroque Library.ADVERTISEMENT

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The Baroque Library opened its porcelain doors to the public in 1972. It is a structure that was initially a part of a Jesuit university. When you enter the building, you will be welcomed by the astounding architecture including the ceiling decorated with frescoes. We’re pretty sure the books will not disappoint, too.ADVERTISEMENT

Jessica Tandy poses for the camera, 1943

A slew of young actresses surfaced in the 1940s but there was no one quite like Jessica Tandy. At merely 18 years of age, the talented actress built her career on stage in London. She often bagged roles opposite stage veteran Laurence Olivier. Upon mastering the art of acting on stage, Tandy entered the world of radio and films. ADVERTISEMENT

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Tandy skyrocketed to stardom after starring in the 1989 comedy Driving Miss Daisy and 1991 drama Fried Green Tomatoes. She was married to Canadian actor Hume Cronyn. The couple stayed together until her death in 1994. ADVERTISEMENT

An aerial view of the Faroe Islands

The Faroe Islands is an archipelago nestled between Iceland and Norway. It looks like it was downloaded straight from the computer wallpapers, but the scenic view is a real place in this world. Nordic people live in the island. They speak Faroese, a language that’s descended from Old Norse.ADVERTISEMENT

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A must-try in the Faroe Islands is their is the beer that they originally make in the island. Since 1888, they have a brewery that exports mainly to Iceland and Denmark. The locals mostly eat meat, seafood, and they specifically like to eat mutton made of sheep. ADVERTISEMENT

A woman rides the chairlift at Wyoming, 1955

If you take a quick look, you would assume that the woman was enjoying an amusement park ride, but she was actually sitting on the chairlift. The chairlift on Snow King was actually the first one in Wyoming. It was installed using the wheels of an Army pickup truck to drive the ropes. This was somehow an upgrade compared to riding in an ore bucket. ADVERTISEMENT

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By 1955, Snow King’s elevated passenger ropeway could already move 200 chairs per hour. However, there had been changes and a double chair line was installed in 1958. ADVERTISEMENT

Marilyn Monroe relaxes at her home, 1951

When she’s not turning heads and making jaws drop, Marilyn Monroe was at home enjoying a good read. She was clearly relaxed on that comfy sofa bed. The behind-the-curtains photo reminds us ordinary people that these stars are human beings, too. Marilyn Monroe did start small, she was just an actress accepting insignificant roles in any film she could be in. ADVERTISEMENT

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The blonde beauty shot to fame after starring in the 1950 film The Asphalt Jungle. She had roles in other movies such as Home Town Story, As Young As You Feel, Love Nest, and Let’s Make It Legal. At the time, she thought that was already the peak of her career, but bigger films would come her way years later. ADVERTISEMENT

Men protest prohibition, 1925

History classes have given us an idea on what Prohibition was. If anything, those who love drinking are more than thankful they were not born in that era. They would most likely protest too for being deprived of alcohol. This group of patriots made their voices heard when the government deemed it was illegal to produce, transport, or sell liquor from 1920 to 1933.ADVERTISEMENT

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While the Prohibition in the 1920s had positive effects such as reducing the alcohol consumption by half, it also resulted to the fury of people who just wanted a drink. They resorted to getting their alcohol fix from members of organized crime for a higher price. 
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One of the stone carvings on Notre Dame, 1910

In 2019, the whole world woke up to the devastating news that the Notre-Dame de Paris was severely burned. It created an international buzz because the structure has been around since 1163. The infamous cathedral has always been under some kind of construction, but the recent incident has prolonged the process. ADVERTISEMENT

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One of the remarkable features of Notre-Dame de Paris are the stone carvings called gargoyles. Art historian Michael Camille shared her thoughts on the artificial creatures, “On medieval churches gargoyles rotted so quickly, if they did their job properly and carried off water, that only a century or so after they were made they had to be replaced.”ADVERTISEMENT

Lady bikers smile for LIFE Magazine, 1949

Whoever said men used to be the only ones who rode motorcycles have never seen this 1949 photo. For these women, there was nothing more electrifying than hitting the open road and feeling the wind blow in your hair as you drive that steel horse. ADVERTISEMENT

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The American lady bikers were more than thrilled to ride their bikes after the war has been won. For once, they had hope again. Everything was going to be okay. Here’s to riding until we ran out of road. ADVERTISEMENT

A young woman from the Ouled Naïl tribe, 1905 

The Ouled Naïl is not something we always read in history books and other printed publications. That doesn’t mean that they are not significant. It only means that they need to be placed under the spotlight more. They are a tribe of people located in the Ouled Naïl Range in Algeria. They get their supplies by traveling to Djelfa to trade cattle and buy imports. ADVERTISEMENT

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Since the Ouled Naïl shares their history orally, no one is beyond certain as to where they trace back. There are members of the tribe who claim to descend from Arab tribes a thousand years ago. Meanwhile, other members believe they are from the Banu Hilal of Hejaz. Regardless, their tribal lifestyle is definitely worth knowing. ADVERTISEMENT

A 19-year-old Brigitte Bardot poses at a beach, 1953 

Another teenager that was considered a headturner in the 1950s was Brigitte Bardot. Her Elle magazine cover in 1952 put her name (and face!) on the map. The model was cast in the comedy film Crazy for Love, directed by Jean Boyer. After a year, Bardot was already invited at the Cannes Film Festival.ADVERTISEMENT

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The French found fame outside her home country, too. In 1953, Bardot landed a role in the American film Act of Love. After three years, the budding actress catapulted to fame for her work in And God Created Woman.ADVERTISEMENT

George Harrison and Stevie Nicks smile for the camera, 1978 

It’s a small world for the music industry. Famous people tend to meet other famous people. For some, it results to collaborations, while for others to a long-lasting friendship. Apparently, Stevie Nicks and George Harrison were close pals— so close that she even helped him write the 1979 song “Here Comes The Moon.” ADVERTISEMENT

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In the book George Harrison: Behind The Locked Door, Nicks revealed that she looks at a photo of her and Harrison whenever she feels down, “There’s lots of nights where you kind of go, I wish I didn’t have to go on stage tonight, I’m tired, I don’t feel like doing it, and I look at George Harrison and me and I go, well, you just have to, because it’s important, it’s important to make people happy…”ADVERTISEMENT

A 10-year-old Dr. Seuss with his dog Rex, 1914

We bet you don’t recognize this little boy so we’ll give you a hint. He was a famous American children’s author and political cartoonist. Yup, it’s Dr. Seuss! Born Theodore Geisel, Dr. Seuss used to help his father work in the family brewery in Springfield, Massachusetts until it was closed due to prohibition. ADVERTISEMENT

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Since business was closed, young Theodore devoted his afternoons at the local zoo. He would sketch the animals while hanging out with his mother and sister— probably why wacky animals made their way into the doctor’s later work. Seuss was his mother’s maiden name.ADVERTISEMENT

Alfred Hitchcock and his grandchildren enjoy a sleigh ride, 1960

Looking at this photo of Alfred Hitchcock with his grandchildren, it’s safe to say that the master of terror never brought his work home. There is satisfying feeling that when the cameras were not rolling, Hitchcock was at peace. The renowned director obviously liked to goof around with with his grandkids.https://4a6f93a1068edd7d873a041c36afb726.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.htmlADVERTISEMENT

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Hitchcock’s granddaughter,  Tere Carrubba, once revealed that the famed filmmaker always enjoyed spending time with them. She also disclosed that her grandpa would often take trips to Scotts Valley just to get away.ADVERTISEMENT

Grace Kelly on her wedding day, 1956

Before Meghan Markle, Hollywood icon Grace Kelly was the American actress who married into royalty. Kelly became the Princess of Monaco after being wed to Prince Rainier. Her wedding dress, which required 30 seamstresses and six weeks to produce, made her look like the royalty that she was meant to be.ADVERTISEMENT

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Grace Kelly’s big day was filled by celebrity friends— similar with the Duchess of Sussex’s. The list included Cary Grant, Ava Gardner, and Gloria Swanson. According to the princess’ son, Prince Albert II, both of his parents thought that the whole royal event was too much.

Grace Kelly’s big day was filled by celebrity friends— similar with the Duchess of Sussex’s. The list included Cary Grant, Ava Gardner, and Gloria Swanson. According to the princess’ son, Prince Albert II, both of his parents thought that the whole royal event was too much.ADVERTISEMENT

Lisa and Louise Burns on the set of The Shining, 1980

A movie buff’s life would not be complete without seeing The Shining. The 1980 film is one of the most terrifying movies ever created. Among the classic scenes was when young Danny runs into the Grady twins. The iconic roles were played by the talented duo Lisa and Louise Burns.ADVERTISEMENT

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Judging by this rare picture, the Burns twins had loads of fun filming. They even stated it in an interview with the Daily Mail, “Everyday felt like we’d been invited to a very exclusive party and we were the youngest, luckiest people to be there. Stanley wanted us on set every single day, so between scenes we would play with Danny [Lloyd] and Jack [Nicholson].”ADVERTISEMENT

A baby in an overhead cradle on an airplane, 1950s

If we are talking about rare images in history then this is one for the books. Unbeknownst to many, airplanes used to have overhead compartments for the babies to sleep in. We’re not even sure if that made the parents’ lives easier in the flying engine.ADVERTISEMENT

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Obviously, the trend of these “sky cots” never lasted that long. The problem of overhead luggage and turbulence must have been the issues. We imagine now that the air pocket will cause stress if they were still available.ADVERTISEMENT

Robert De Niro and Martin Scorsese’s mom, 1989

Martin Scorsese can be considered “blessed” not only because of his scores of awards, but also because he had a supportive mother. And by support, we don’t just mean her encouraging words but cooking-on-set support. In one of his greatest films Goodfellas, the acclaimed director’s mom appeared on the movie and also cooked food for the cast and crew during filming. Our boy Robert de Niro seemed to have found it delicious.ADVERTISEMENT

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Scorsese opened about his mother during an interview with Jimmy Kimmel. “My mother made a dish called chicken with lemon and garlic and if you go to Francis Coppola’s restaurant he has it on the menu… It’s pretty good, pretty close… It was delicious,” the acclaimed filmmaker said.ADVERTISEMENT

The cast of The Outsiders, 1983

Rumor has it that staring at this iconic photo would melt your hearts instantly. There is no shortage of future heartthrobs here! Thanks to Francis Coppola’s 1980s film The Outsiders, we met the handsome faces of Tom Cruise, Matt Dillon, Patrick Swayze, Ralph Macchio, Emilio Estevez, C. Thomas Howell and Rob Lowe.ADVERTISEMENT

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It only just a few more projects before these sweethearts became the subject of screaming fans. The Outsiders follows the story of a struggling group of lower class friends in the 1950s. It is one of the greatest works of the veteran director.ADVERTISEMENT

Fearless painters on the Woolworth Building, 1926

Images past, we have honored the steelworkers and photographers for their bravery thousands of feet above. Some painters also deserve the applause. They risk their lives to make sure that the buildings look aesthetically pleasing, just like the ones in this photo.ADVERTISEMENT

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Just looking at this 1926 photo makes our stomachs churn, so props to this crew for still being able to smile and wave at the camera. They were painting the Woolworth Building in New York City. The job requires trusting both your harness and your workmates. Now we can’t help but wonder where they spend their time during break.ADVERTISEMENT

The University of Texas women’s track team at practice, 1964

Texas is not all about the grilled food and action movies. Sometimes it’s about the sports, too.  We’re not only talking about football, as the lone star state also cares about other sports. As early as the 1960s, the women’s track team of the University of Texas performed like they were competing in the Olympics.ADVERTISEMENT

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Mind you, these athletes are all about running and looking great at the same time. Just take a peek at the female sports stars donning that hair spray on their heads. Petition to give them few extra points, please!ADVERTISEMENT

A tree grows through a piano

Real art enthusiasts know that art does not just exist in the four corners of a museum but it is basically everywhere. In this case, it was located at the California State University in Monterey, California. This piano growing around the tree was cleverly done by cutting the main pieces of the instrument in half and then placing them around the tree. ADVERTISEMENT

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The man behind this fine of art was named Jeff Mifflin. He was clearly thinking out of the box.  According to Mifflin, he wanted the people who come across it to imagine the “ethereal sound” of the wind through the leaves of the tree.ADVERTISEMENT

“Evening near the Pyramids”, 1897 

Let’s take a trip to the Middle East this time around. Captured by Ernest Ashton, the old picture reveals the timeless beauty of the region. He photographed the amazing view of the pyramids after waiting for the sun to set. The result was worth the wait and the long travel. We have to take note that this wasn’t easy skill.ADVERTISEMENT

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There was no advanced technology yet on taking and editing photos in 1897 so Ashton had to rely on his own skill. He highlighted the contrasting light and shadow all by himself. This stunning photo is only about five inches by seven inches in size but definitely a huge masterpiece.ADVERTISEMENT

Cow shoes used by moonshiners, 1924

It’s impossible to discuss the ’20s decade and not delve on the sense of style of the people. Up until now, there are still trends that stood the test of time. Some fashion accessories were actually used for its functionality. In this case, moonshiners wore “cow shoes” to hide their identity during Prohibition. ADVERTISEMENT

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To throw the police off their scent, bootleggers and moonshiners put these pieces of wood to the soles of their shoes. That way, their footprints looked more like hoof prints. Those who benefitted from the illegal liquor owe these real risk takers a drink or two.ADVERTISEMENT

A colorized photo of Susan Peters, 1943

Susan Peters left a mark in the show business even though she worked in films just for a short time. The bright star began acting in 1940s films such as Dr. Gillespie’s New Assistant and The Big Shot. Peters then bagged Academy Award nomination for her role as Kitty in the 1942 drama Random Harvest.ADVERTISEMENT

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To the devastation of her fans, Peters’ thriving career on the big screen was cut short in 1952 because of her unexpected demise. She passed away due to chronic kidney infection. You may find her shining star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ADVERTISEMENT

Hoover Dam under construction, 1934

The survival of America during the Great Depression could be highly credited to the creation of Hoover Dam. The five-year construction of the dam cost $49 million— about $639 million in 2016. Since the 1900s, the spot in Black Canyon had been pegged as a place for a dam. The project wasn’t started until Congress gave the green light.ADVERTISEMENT

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This massive project saved thousands of unemployed Americans from the brink of hunger and poverty. They finally found a way to earn money. In 1934, employment for the Dam reached 5,251 laborers. Hoover Dam was made in time for its dedication.ADVERTISEMENT

Kmart, 1970s

One of the favorite decades that we enjoy looking back at is the ’70s. The disco era never ran out of things that turn out to be legendary. Among the coolest place at the time was Kmart, a popular savings store. It was basically a one stop shop for anyone who needed anything. Foods, clothings, you name it, they have it— and for a discounted price! ADVERTISEMENT

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Kmart completely turned the tables in their favor when they introduced the blue light special. Having the blue lights on was equivalent to saving money because the shoppers had an hour to score extra savings on select items. Because of their fantastic deals, the popular store was often jam-packed. ADVERTISEMENT

Rabbit Tail from the Shoshone tribe, 1895

In the late 1800s, the European-American settlers dispersed across the United States. Among of those who were affected by this migration was the Shoshone tribe. They were displaced from their homes—which was in Idaho and Wyoming in the present. Despite their disagreements, the Shoshone tribe teamed up with the United States Army during the Battle of the Rosebud in 1878.https://4a6f93a1068edd7d873a041c36afb726.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.htmlADVERTISEMENT

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Setting aside their differences, the US Army enlisted Rabbit-Tail and many other Shoshone tribe members as Army Scouts. They were men who could specialized in following horse tracks and identifying military group intel.  ADVERTISEMENT

A guy hangs a “Just Divorced” sign board on his car, 1934

Instead of the usual “Just Married” sign, the man on the photo hung a “Just Divorced” sign on the back of his car. He was clearly elated to announce the word that his marriage was over. This is equivalent to changing your relationship status on Facebook and deleting couple pictures on Instagram.ADVERTISEMENT

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There is a high chance that they went to splitsville because of the guy’s humor. If so, at least he took the whole thing lightly. Besides, he has got a lot of things ahead.

The night watchdog on duty at Macy’s department store, 1954

Humans have always counted on dogs. They are great best friends and sometimes, they are fit to be security guards too. In the 20th century, major stores like Macy’s in New York “employed” dogs to keep their merchandise safe. They were deemed reliable because they barked loudly and acted mean when needed to be.ADVERTISEMENT

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The security trend spawned an intense demand for the Doberman Pinschers and German Shepherds. This job opportunity for dogs went out of fashion when modern security systems were invented. In the present, dogs are still a huge help to our forces.ADVERTISEMENT

A graveyard for the red telephone boxes

You think you know a lot about the British? How about this— they actually retire their red telephone boxes. Yup, when these iconic booths are not functional and not aesthetically pleasing anymore, they are sent to storage spaces in English small villages.ADVERTISEMENT

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Get this, there is actually a phone booth cemetery in Carlton Miniott. Aside from dump sites, this cemetery holds hundreds of them in different states of disrepair. Creepy! Some artists actually pick these red phone boxes up and recycle them. If you’re in the area, you can do it yourself.ADVERTISEMENT

A lion cub visits a second grade class, 1951

Lions are some of the wildest animals, so just the thought of letting them hang out with kids is a total nightmare for parents. Well, it happened and it actually turned out well. A real lion used to hang out in Kansas City classrooms in 1956. This lion cub’s named Kyla, and she was hosted by Stuart Hansen and his wife in their humble abode. ADVERTISEMENT

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Kyla transformed to a famous figure overnight and people began to visit the couple’s home just to meet the little lion. According to The Garden City Telegram, the little lion shortly began making appearances at the local schools due to the “traffic” moving through the Hansen residence. We wish we’ve met Kyle!ADVERTISEMENT

Miners use an “aerial tram” to descend, 1885

We have a feeling that these vintage picture of miners riding an “aerial tram” would give amusement park riders the thrill. Only these workers were using it as a way to descend into the Kimberly Diamond Mine. The South African mine is a diamond mining epicenter that began operating in 1869.ADVERTISEMENT

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The miners thought of this genius yet dangerous way of transportation after settling down in the area. They built an entire town around the mine and created a series of railways into the dig site. Too bad for diamond lovers and production companies, the mine was shut down in 1914. ADVERTISEMENT

John Candy, Tom Hanks, Eugene Levy, and Daryl Hannah, 1984

Daryl Hannah’s castmates in the 1984 film Splash made sure she did not feel alone while being transformed into a mermaid. They accompanied her as the prosthetics were applied to her lower body. It was definitely worth it as Splash emerged as one of the greatest films of the decade. ADVERTISEMENT

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Hannah did not hold back about her costume experience saying, “My circulation would be gone in my extremities, so it took a while before I could walk again. It made me very sympathetic to fish! I remember when I was filming the scene in the lab tank I was very upset about a big fish that was being kept in a smaller tank.”ADVERTISEMENT

A shoe shiner works on Boulevard Du Temple, 1839

Jush when a shoe shiner and a customer on Boulevard du Temple in Paris thought it was just going to be a normal day for them, they became a part of history as the first known people to be photographed. Thanks to French artist Louis Daguerre, they ended up appearing on the first mirror-image photograph.ADVERTISEMENT

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Daguerre’s photograph was a major development back then because people used to just appear on artworks such as paintings. He was given the proper credit by being regarded as one of the fathers of photography.ADVERTISEMENT

Elvis Presley at the barber shop, 1958

When he was not on stage mesmerizing people with his talent and charisma, Elvis Presley was at barber shop, getting a haircut. Apparently, even legendary musicians passed by the hair salon, too. The historical photo was captured on March 25, 1958, when Presley got his first Army buzz cut.ADVERTISEMENT

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Here’s some good new for die-hard fans of the King of Rock ‘N Roll. You could actually visit this the sacred spot. Just book a ticket to the Chaffee Barbershop Museum in Arkansas. The barber shop looks pretty much the same as the day the King set foot in there, although the barber chairs were already handed to good cause.ADVERTISEMENT

Hippo surfs in the ocean, 2000

A hippopotamus swimming in the Atlantic Ocean? Now that is a sight for sore eyes. We honestly did know it was possible! Hippos are fond of bodies of water, but they usually inhabit on inland rivers or swamps. Luckily, American journalist Michael Nichols moved mountains all the way from Congo in central Africa to Gabon on the continent’s west coast.ADVERTISEMENT

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This endearing photo of peeking hippo brought about more attention to the wild life. Upon seeing the image, Gabon President Omar Bongo was inspired to create a special space for the wild animals. They built a system of national parks that now cover 11% of the country. ADVERTISEMENT

Muhammad Ali defeats Sonny Liston, 1965

There is nothing like capturing an athlete in their element. More importantly, if the athlete is the greatest boxer. This image featuring a triumphant Muhammad Ali was deemed the greatest sports photo of the century. Sports Illustrated photographer Neil Leifer captured this in Lewiston, Maine, on May 25, 1965. He happened to be at the right spot and at the right moment. “I was obviously in the right seat, but what matters is I didn’t miss,” Leifer later said.ADVERTISEMENT

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Muhammad Ali was only 23 years old when he defeated Sonny Liston who was 34 years old. Leifer’s shot was only a minute and 44 seconds into the first round. Thanks to the overhead lights and smoke clouds, the historical moment was preserved magnificently.ADVERTISEMENT

Aircraft crashes in front of a farmer

We could not help but worry and be amazed by looking at this rare historical photo. Talk about being at the right place at the exact time. It shows a pilot and an airplane falling down fast from the sky. The crash took place right i front of the boy in his farm. ADVERTISEMENT

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Miraculously, the pilot lived to see another day as he only sustained minor injuries. It is also worth noting that he probably already knew the engine had failed so he made use of his knowledge in aeronautics. 
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Albert Einstein and David Rothman at the beach, 1939

Albert Einstein appears twice in this list because this time around he had company. Sitting beside the genius was local department store owner David Rothman. They were hanging out at the beach near his Long Island home. It’s cool that they found themselves relaxing by the sea, but how did this strange duo struck up a friendship?ADVERTISEMENT

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Apparently, Einstein’s German accent is the reason for this friendship. Back at the department store, he requested for a pair of “sundahls.” Rothman thought he heard “sundial.” They ended up forging a bond and forming a band together. ADVERTISEMENT

Nuit de Noël, 1963

Mali was colonized by France from 1892 to 1960. As the French colonial came to an end, local photographer Malick Sidibé wanted to capture through his lens, the changes that the West African went through. One image that stood out was this young couple at a club dancing their hearts out. According to Sidibé, “everyone had to have the latest Paris style.”ADVERTISEMENT

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He added, “We were entering a new era, and people wanted to dance. Music freed us. Suddenly, young men could get close to young women, hold them in their hands. Before, it was not allowed. And everyone wanted to be photographed dancing up close.”ADVERTISEMENT

“Guerrillero Heroico”, 1960

Known as the “Guerrillero Heroico” this historical photo shows Che Guevara. The familiar face was a Marxist revolutionary who represented rebellion. As it turns out, the iconic photograph was actually almost thrown away in history.ADVERTISEMENT

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You see, the Cuban regime only recognized Guevara’s contributions years after he was killed in Bolivia. The image of the beret-clad fighter became an enduring symbol of martyrdom for the movement. Guerrillero Heroico was published in print, soft drinks, and other forms of protest art. ADVERTISEMENT

The Hindenburg catches fire, 1937

The Hindenburg disaster is one of the major reasons why we never see airships nowadays. It was on May 6, 1937 when the Zeppelin grand ship burned in flames. What was supposed to be just a descent at the Naval Air Station in New Jersey resulted to thirty six fatalities.ADVERTISEMENT

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Many photographers and other members of the media witnessed the catastrophic scene since they were actually there to highlight the 804-foot-long LZ 129 Hindenburg. Instead, the horrible event transpired when it caught fire. So, if you’re puzzled about why airships never boomed, that’s because of this earlier disaster.  ADVERTISEMENT

A prisoner tests a safety net, 1958

If you are wondering why the man does not seem like he is enjoying his ride, that’s because his life was seriously on the line. The popular photo from 1958 features a man perched on something similar to a detached roller coaster. The truth? They were using this prisoner to check if safety nets were ready to be mass produced.ADVERTISEMENT

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Needless to say, that was such a merciless move on the part of those in authority. The thing is, capital punishment was prevalent in the United States at the time, so they thought they better utilized the inmates before they hit the chair. ADVERTISEMENT

American athletes raise their fists, 1968

American sprinters Tommie Smith and John Carlos made history in the 1968 Olympics not only during the games but also when they were given their awards. As they were receiving their medals in Mexico, gold medalist Smith and bronze medalist Carlos bowed their heads and raised their fists in the air.ADVERTISEMENT

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Smith and Carlo wanted to tell the world that despite the victory, there is still a war to be won which is the rampant inequality in the world. They put their fists in the air just as the national anthem of the United States was about to play. According to Carlos, “We knew that what we were going to do was far greater than any athletic feat.”ADVERTISEMENT

Multiple images of 99 Cents, 1999

Now that we got a glimpse of Kmart in the ’70s, let’s put the spotlight on the 99 Cents Only store in the ’90s. You might find it ironic that this image featuring cheap goods actually set a record for the most expensive contemporary photograph ever sold.ADVERTISEMENT

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This vibrant colored image came to be from stitching multiple photos of the Los Angeles store together digitally. It created this large-scale photo. Instead of the contemporary photograph that it is, this masterpiece resembles an Impressionist painting.ADVERTISEMENT

Tallest man in the world

You are currently staring at the tallest person to have ever lived. His name was Robert Wadlow. Notice that even if he was already laying sideways, you could still see how lengthy he was. Born in Alton, Illinois, Wadlow was fondly called “The Alton Giant” and “Giant of Illinois.” ADVERTISEMENT

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The other guy on the photo was actually the average height but sitting beside Wadlow made him look like he was extremely short. The Alton Giant stood 8 feet and 11 inches tall and lived from 1918 to 1940.ADVERTISEMENT

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer records their lion mascot, 1928

The Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer is well-known for its signature roaring lion logo. Many generations have familiarized it as they grew up. Almost every production began with the mascot of a lion appearing on the screen. In case you didn’t know, they actually used real lions.ADVERTISEMENT

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In their earlier decades, they used more than one lion for the logo. Here, we have Jackie being recorded for the beginning of MGM talking movies. Jackie was a lion brought from the Sudan. To be able to record his roar, the studio built a sound stage around his cage.ADVERTISEMENT

“Mona Lisa” of the Pacific Islands, 1875

If the Europe has the painting of Mona Lisa, the Pacific Islands has this portrait of a woman whose identity also remains unknown. In 1875, Dutch photographer Francisco Van Camp took a photograph of her in his studio in Manila. At the time the Philippines was under the Spanish colonial rule.ADVERTISEMENT

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Up until today, no one can identify this beautiful young woman. One thing that they are sure of is that she was a  “Mestiza de Sangley.” They were coined to describe people with Chinese ancestors. Those traditional garments are fit for her one-of-a-kind beauty.ADVERTISEMENT

“The Babe Bows Out”, 1948

Baseball fans may argue that this iconic photo of Babe Ruth could be the greatest sports photo of the 20th century. After all, he was the greatest baseball player to have played on the field. Diagnosed with terminal cancer, the beloved Bambino was still in attendance during the silver anniversary celebration of the Yankee Stadium on June 13, 1948. ADVERTISEMENT

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Sadly for everyone who knew and loved Ruth, he died two months after this public appearance in “the House That Ruth Built.” This historical image earned American photographer Nat Fein a Pulitzer Prize— the first one awarded to a sports photographer.ADVERTISEMENT

Chinese man steps in front of a column of tanks, 1989

The day after a massacre took place in Tiananmen Square, a Chinese man made history by stepping in front of the troops. Many international media people were staying at a Beijing hotel nearby so they were able to capture it. If you may recall, thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators were attacked by the Chinese troops. ADVERTISEMENT

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This photo landed on the cover of newspapers and magazines all over the world. The fact that no one knows the identity of the Chinese man made it all the more powerful. Fortunately, he was not injured after his fearless act. ADVERTISEMENT

A girl works at a cotton mill, 1908

Photojournalists exist not only to capture special moments, but also to motivate change. There are cases when they witness adversities and realize that something badly needs to be fixed. Lewis Hine, an investigative photographer for the National Child Labor Committee, knew it was his job to forward the dire condition of millions of children working at a tender age.ADVERTISEMENT

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Of course, Hine had to be creative in order to gain access in the mills and factories. he disguised himself as he visited such places from Massachusetts to South Carolina. This young girl was one of the many small children at work photographed. She was manning a larger-than-life cotton-spinning machine.ADVERTISEMENT

Earth from the side of the moon, 1968

Louis Armstrong was obviously not lying when he thought to himself, “what a wonderful world.” The line does not only apply when seeing our world from within. This 1968 image of the Earth in space is proof that it is indeed wonderful. ADVERTISEMENT

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Perhaps the fact that this was photographed on Christmas Eve adds some sentimental value. The Apollo 8 was en route to becoming the first manned mission to orbit the moon. Just as astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell, and Bill Anders were about to surface from the side of the moon, they spotted our beautiful planet through one of the hatch windows. ADVERTISEMENT

A portrait of Salvador Dalí, 1948

Surrealist painter Salvador Dalí spiced things up when he became the subject of his friend Philippe Halsman. In 1948, the famed artist Salvador Dalí took a step in front of the camera. His longtime collaborator Halmas has also photographed Albert Einstein, Marilyn Monroe, and Alfred Hitchcock.ADVERTISEMENT

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This vision in black and white is what spectators get two masters of art work together. After 26 takes, Halsman was finally able to capture the essence of Dalí with his painting Leda Atomica, a floating chair, a bucket of water and three cats thrown into the air. ADVERTISEMENT

The first picture taken via cellphone, 1997

Millions of photos especially selfies have been taken in this world. If you are wondering the first ever cellular phone picture looked like, it is right in front of your screen. This historic image wasn’t even planned! The software entrepreneur behind the photo was Philippe Kahn, who had nothing better to do at the Northern California maternity ward. ADVERTISEMENT

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Apparently, the would-be father just wanted to entertain himself while waiting for his wife to give birth. He was able to invent a device that could send the baby picture to his family and friends. Kahn came up with this invention through a a digital camera connected to his flip-top cell phone.ADVERTISEMENT

Michael Jordan soars through the air, 1984

NBA fans and ballers have grown accustomed to the Jumpman photo. After all, it was the silhouette of Michael Jordan. This just might be the most famous silhouette photo ever taken. The basketball legend aiming for a dunk and splitting his legs while in the air was kept alive forever.ADVERTISEMENT

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Jacobus “Co” Rentmeester only a received an underwhelming U$S150 from shoe giant Nike for the temporary use of his shot. Soon enough, the icon was imprinted on shoes, clothing, posters, and more. ADVERTISEMENT

Mushroom cloud forms over Nagasaki, 1945

This explosive image showing some smoke that formed into the shape of a mushroom was taken after the bombing on Nagasaki, Japan. Without any alarm, the United States dropped the atomic bomb Fat Man. Photographed in 1945, the man behind the lens was not a photographer, but rather, an officer named Lieutenant Charles Levy.ADVERTISEMENT

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Levy recounted, “We saw this big plume climbing up, up into the sky… It was purple, red, white, all colors—something like boiling coffee. It looked alive.” The military man’s image of the mushroom cloud was widely circulated.ADVERTISEMENT

Dovima modeling haute couture with elephants, 1955

“Dovima With Elephants” was photographed in the 1950s but it has remained a powerful photo in the fashion industry. The editorial featuring Dovima and the two mammoths is nothing short of captivating. Well, what did we expect from a collaboration between one of the most famous models, and one of the most famous fashion photographers.ADVERTISEMENT

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Harper’s Bazaar commissioned this fashion shoot in 1955. Shot at a Paris circus, Dovima was a vision in haute couture with the enormous elephants. She was actually wearing the first Dior dress designed by Yves Saint Laurent.ADVERTISEMENT

The Beatles have a pillow fight, 1964

The Beatles was so popular in their prime that it spawned a fan frenzy called the “Beatlemania.” Some intense fans followed the four boys around wherever they went. Of course behind the stage, that’s when John, Paul, George and Ringo could breathe and be themselves. Well, this unstaged photo of the British boys having a pillow fight at the George V Hotel should give you an idea of who they were offstage.ADVERTISEMENT

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The Beatles did not do this every single day but at the time, they just learned that “I Want to Hold Your Hand” went number 1 in the US. This image of the rockstars in pure joy helped boost the morale of the Americans, who were still mourning the assassination of former President John F. Kennedy.ADVERTISEMENT

Navajos ride off their ancestral land, 1904

History books do not delve much on this fact but the Native Americans lived peacefully in their lands before being disturbed by external forces. During the grand westward advance in the United States, they were affected the most. The Indians were evicted and forced to stay at impoverished reservations. ADVERTISEMENT

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Here in this photo, American photographer Edward S. Curtis  wanted to immortalize and show the world how the Navajos had to ride off their homes. As their tribes were on the brink of disappearing, Curtis made sure to exhibit them as noble people—“the old time Indian, his dress, his ceremonies, his life and manners.” ADVERTISEMENT

Two sophisticated ladies lounge in a modern house, 1960

It’s hard to believe that this modern house was captured by photographer Julius Shulman in the 1960s. Located in Los Angeles, the glass-­enclosed home was owned by architect Pierre Koenig. This was just one of the more than 30 case study houses that experimented on modern style and industrial materials. ADVERTISEMENT

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Shulman asked the two stylish women to position themselves inside so he could give the audience a perspective of the Hollywood Hills house floating above the City of Angels.ADVERTISEMENT

“The Pond—Moonlight”, 1904 

Have you ever seen a work that can be both classified as a photograph and as a painting? Feast your eyes with this exquisite work by Edward Steichen. Captured in Mamaroneck, New York, “The Pond—Moonlight” is a combination of hand color and black-and-white prints.This technique blurring two mediums is called “Pictorialism.”ADVERTISEMENT

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An army of future artists was awe-struck by Steichen’s work. He taught them how to create scenes out of the moments they find themselves in. It has been a century since the renowned artist made the image but it remains powerful, with a print selling for almost $3 million.ADVERTISEMENT

Mahatma Gandhi and the spinning wheel, 1946

We have learned in history that Mahatma Gandhi was Britain’s prisoner in India for a year. Here, we see him reading the news alongside his charkha, which was a portable spinning wheel. Making his own thread was just supposed to be a source of comfort for the Indian leader, but it ended up becoming a symbol of campaign for independence.ADVERTISEMENT

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As an influential figure, Gandhi asked his fellow Indians to resist buying British goods. He offered them with an alternative to spin their own cloth. The popular guy was so caught into it that he even required American photographer Margaret Bourke-White to learn the craft before she was allowed to take pictures of him.ADVERTISEMENT

The Pillars of Creation, 1995

No, this is not a frame from any of the Star Wars film. This is the Pillars of Creation. The awe-inspiring image is legitimate and it was captured in 1995 by the Hubble Space Telescope. You see, the equipment almost did not make it aboard the space shuttle ­Atlantis.ADVERTISEMENT

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By some miracle, the telescope made it and gifted us with this spectacular image of the universe. To be specific, this was the Eagle Nebula, a star-forming patch of space 6,500 light-years from Earth. It belonged to the Serpens Cauda constellation.ADVERTISEMENT

Princess Diana meets Rowan Atkinson, 1984

This 1984 image is bound to put a smile on the face of any British. They have here two icons meeting each other for the first time. Princess Diana seemed to have recognized the face of comedian Rowan Atkinson when she was introduced to the cast of the TV show “Royal Variety Performance.” She seemed to mouth, “You!” while the Mr. Bean actor felt flattered. ADVERTISEMENT

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Captured at the Victoria Palace Theatre in London, everyone was in the mood to meet the beloved Princess of Wales. As you may recall, there was actually an episode on the animated series of Mr. Bean where he tours the royal palace. ADVERTISEMENT

A Jewish boy raises his hands up, 1943

Children are supposed to spend their childhood learning the ropes of a normal life and basically enjoying life without responsibilities. That was not the case for Jewish kids during World War II. Thousands of children had to give up their days of innocence at an early age. This Jewish young boy looked terrified as he surrendered in Warsaw neighborhood overpowered by the Nazis. ADVERTISEMENT

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There were actually groups who tried to resist and fight against the Germans. They were, however, overpowered by the the tanks and flamethrowers. As the revolt ended, the more than 50,000 survivors suffered at concentration camps and faced execution. ADVERTISEMENT

A British guard falls to the ground, 1970

Parades can be exhausting even for soldiers who are trained to survive during the hardest times. In 1970, a soldier of Queen Elizabeth’s almost passed out to the ground during the Color Parade. This is an unusual scene given that the guards are usually statue-like because of their lack of movements. Perhaps the lack of circulation and the scorching heat caused him to lose his balance. ADVERTISEMENT

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There is a high chance that the British guard fell to the ground because he couldn’t bear the excitement of meeting Her Majesty. The warm red coat uniform certainly did not help. We certainly hope that the guy beside him was able to prevent his fall.ADVERTISEMENT

World leaders at The Hague, 1930

Here’s your exclusive peak at what happened behind the curtains during the first world war. German photojournalist Erich Salomon gave the citizens a look at the statesmen with their guards down. The strategic reporter snuck into the doors of power at The Hague with his tiny camera built to shoot in low light.ADVERTISEMENT

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You have take into mind that this was during the wee hours of the morning already, and yet the global leaders were still not done deciding the future of their countries. They were discussing the reparations of the World War I. It looks like most of them have gone to dreamland. ADVERTISEMENT

Flight attendant at work, 1960s

There is nothing quite like the high of working 40,000 feet above. If your office was the airplane in the ’60s, then you were an envied woman. Every girl at the time wanted to experience the flight stewardess life. Those who managed to be aboard the plane usually exuded an outstanding beauty and a bright disposition.ADVERTISEMENT

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There were many perks to being a flight stewardess at the time. One could explore the world and don the most fashionable uniform at the same time. This stewardess definitely belonged to the glamorous cabin crew. Over the decades, the uniforms have evolved. ADVERTISEMENT

“The Critic”, 1943

After the Great Depression, Austrian photographer Arthur Fellig experimented on his craft to show that the social and economic inequalities have remained just the same in New York society. What better way to do that on camera than by juxtaposing a few subjects.ADVERTISEMENT

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Fellig then recruited an inebriated woman and instructed her to stand next to the opulent socialites Mrs. George Washington Kavanaugh and Lady Decies as he photographed them. The staged scene at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York resulted to the perfect contract of wealth and poverty. ADVERTISEMENT

Jacqueline Kennedy crosses the street, 1971

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis was no doubt the most popular First Lady in the United States. Even years after the assassination of her husband and former President John F. Kennedy, she remained the media’s apple of the eye. ADVERTISEMENT

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Since the beginning of time, Jackie O faced difficulties living an unbothered life. There were many times the media crossed line including the one who took this photo, Ron Galella. As the photographer hopped in a taxi and followed the former First Lady, he asked the driver to honk his horn and voila, Jackie looks in their direction.  ADVERTISEMENT

Bandits at Mulberry Street, 1888

As early as the nineteenth century, New York was the dream place for newcomers who wanted to belong. Those who made it to the Big Apple struggled financially and found themselves in nearly subhuman squalor. During the Gilded Age, the society turned a blind eye except for brave reporters like the Danish-born Jacob Riis.https://4a6f93a1068edd7d873a041c36afb726.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.htmlhttps://4a6f93a1068edd7d873a041c36afb726.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.htmlADVERTISEMENT

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Riis went beyond his job description and became an advocated for the poor neighborhoods using his magnesium flash powder light. His work resulted to New York State’s landmark Tenement House Act of 1901, which improved the condition of poverty.
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A loggers shaves another man’s beard using an axe

While today’s men already dread the hassle of having to shave their facial hair daily, the historic men seemed to have found joy and thrill in using an axe. During the Great Depression era, this dangerous act done by the likes of Paul Criss and Leonard Wallulis was nothing short of special. https://4a6f93a1068edd7d873a041c36afb726.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.htmlhttps://4a6f93a1068edd7d873a041c36afb726.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.htmlADVERTISEMENT

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The two lumberjacks were out in the open to be show in front of an audience how to remove their beard using an oversized blade. Eventually, Criss made a fortune out of selling axes for the Kelly Axe Company, while Wallulis emerged a finalist in the Ripley’s Believe it or Not contest in 1936.https://4a6f93a1068edd7d873a041c36afb726.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.htmlADVERTISEMENT

Mao Zedong swims in the Yangtze River, 1966

Mao Zedong was an influential Chinese leader. He did not build his regime in a day and he sure did not want to lose it overnight. So when his decades-long efforts as Chairman of the Chinese Communist Party were on the verge of being wasted because of the stirrings of a counterrevolution, the 72-year-old politician came up with a public stunt. ADVERTISEMENT

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Mao Zedong and his team decided that the best way to show the world he still had what it took to lead was by dipping himself in the Yangtze River. The man wasn’t born yesterday so his plan to strengthen his image was a total success. 

By montrealexblog

Baratineur est une trouvaille pour un espion

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