First man shot death amid looting

A protester has been shot dead by law enforcement officers in Louisville on the fourth night of unrest following the death of unarmed black man George Floyd.

It is not clear if the man was shot by National Guard – who were brought in on Saturday to quell the unrest in the city – or by a police officer. 

The man, understood to be the owner of a local barbecue restaurant, was killed shortly after midnight when a large crowd gathered in a parking lot after the ‘dusk to dawn’ 9pm curfew began.

Officers tried to break up the crowd when one person fired a shot at the police who shot back, WLKY reported.

It is unclear if the man who died is the one who first fired the shot.

Louisville Police Chief Steve Conrad called the man a ‘protester’, however witnesses said they were not part of the demonstrations. 

The victim would be the first person killed by an officer during the nation-wide unrest. 

Speaking at a press conference today, police chief Conrad said: ‘It’s very clear that many people do not trust the police. That is an issue we’re going to work on and work through.’

His death comes just days after gunfire wounded at least seven people at another Louisville protest against the death of Breonna Taylor, a black woman killed by police in March. 

One person was left in critical condition. Louisville’s Mayor Greg Fischer said police officers did not fire the shots.

Protests have erupted up and down the country after white police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on unarmed George Floyd’s neck for eight minutes and 46 seconds last week, despite Floyd’s desperate repeated pleas for help. Floyd passed out and later died. 

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A protester has been shot dead by law enforcement officers in Louisville on the fourth night of unrest following the death of unarmed black man George Floyd. Pictured: Police at the scene last night

Read moreFirst man shot death amid looting

Looters trash Soho: Smashed windows at Gucci, Chanel and Bloomingdales in New York City

Soho in New York City was ravaged by looters on Sunday night who smashed the windows of luxury stores like Gucci, Chanel and Bloomingdales to steal goods in a wild night of riots that saw more than 250 arrests, cops being injured and one man being shot. 

It remains unclear if those who smashed up the stores were part of protests against George Floyd’s death, or if they belonged to different groups and were merely taking advantage of the chaos unfolding across the country. 

Across New York City on Sunday night, more than 250 people were arrested. Six cops were injured, none seriously, and a man in his twenties was shot in the abdomen after an argument with a different group of young men. 

The man was shot at 12.30am at the corner of Crosby Street and Spring Street, a stone’s throw from the stores that were ransacked. He is in the hospital in a stable condition.  

NYPD cops in riot gear patrolled the streets and helicopters hovered above the neighborhood – known for its trendy restaurants, luxury clothing stores and expensive apartments – throughout the night. 

Similar scenes played out in cities across the country in a sixth night of riots and protests over Floyd’s death. The unarmed 46-year-old black man died on Monday in Minneapolis after cop Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for more than eight minutes. 

Chauvin has now been charged with his murder but three other cops involved are yet to face charges. 

His death has sparked a national conversation about racism and police brutality amid a backdrop of a country that had already been shaken by economic uncertainty and public health fears caused by the coronavirus pandemic. 

Chanel in Soho on Monday morning after looters smashed windows to ransack luxury stores in another night of chaos

Chanel in Soho on Monday morning after looters smashed windows to ransack luxury stores in another night of chaos 

Read moreLooters trash Soho: Smashed windows at Gucci, Chanel and Bloomingdales in New York City

Sex workers offer to limit customers to two positions which ‘minimise the risk of transmitting coronavirus’ to enable brothels to end lockdown in Switzerland

Swiss sex workers have drawn up a list of rules which they say minimises the risk of transmitting coronavirus in brothels, in hopes that the country’s ban on the industry could soon be lifted. 

It comes as Switzerland’s adult industry has been heavily hit by the pandemic, after the government placed a temporary ban on prostitution two months ago to help stop the spread of the virus.  

The plan to reopen the industry, prepared by the organisation ProKoRe, suggests that sex positions which allow for a safe distance between faces, such as ‘doggy style’ and ‘reverse cowgirl’, are advisable.

 An association representing Swiss sex workers has drawn up a list of rules which they say minimises the risk of transmitting coronavirus in brothels, in hopes that the country's ban on the industry could soon be lifted (File image)+2

An association representing Swiss sex workers has drawn up a list of rules which they say minimises the risk of transmitting coronavirus in brothels, in hopes that the country’s ban on the industry could soon be lifted (File image) 

These positions reduce the risk of transmission of the virus in water droplets, Swiss media outlet Watson reported.  

Both ‘doggy style’ and ‘reverse cowgirl’ allow for the woman to face away from her sexual partner, avoiding face-to-face contact.  

Read moreSex workers offer to limit customers to two positions which ‘minimise the risk of transmitting coronavirus’ to enable brothels to end lockdown in Switzerland

Nazi gold worth £1BILLION could be hidden under 16th century Polish palace

Twenty eight tonnes of Nazi gold worth more than £1billion may have been traced to the grounds of a palace in Poland after the location was mentioned in an SS diary.

The stash of gold bars, jewellery and coins is believed to be sitting 200ft down at the bottom of a destroyed well shaft in the grounds of the Hochberg Palace, near the city of Wroclaw.

Researchers from the Polish-German Silesian Bridge Foundation, who claim to have acquired the diary from a masonic lodge, say the treasure was buried in the final days of the Second World War along with the corpses of several witnesses.

28 tonnes of Nazi gold potentially worth £1.25billion could be hidden at the bottom of a destroyed well shaft at this palace in southern Poland, researchers claim

Read moreNazi gold worth £1BILLION could be hidden under 16th century Polish palace

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